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Which one is grammatically correct? I want to say that I waited the time that the bus would leave the terminal in the past tense.

  • While I was waiting for the bus leaves, a man came to talk to me.
  • While I was waiting for the bus to leave, a man came to talk to me.
  • While I was waiting for the bus left, a man came to talk to me.

closed as off-topic by Edwin Ashworth, Ellie Kesselman, tchrist, Armen Ծիրունյան, FumbleFingers Dec 29 '14 at 13:57

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  • None of these are a complete sentence in American English. – keshlam Dec 29 '14 at 8:50
  • Nor British English. Also "I waited the time that the bus would leave the terminal" doesn't make sense either. The second option is a grammatical phrase but it's not a complete sentence and does need something else. You may need to concrete examples with times in order that we can work out the sequence of events you are attempting to describe. – Andrew Leach Dec 29 '14 at 8:55
  • Only the middle one is possible, assuming it is a dependent clause and will be followed by the main clause. We wait for something to happen. We are waiting for you to tell us the whole sentence. – Shoe Dec 29 '14 at 9:01
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Number 2 is best although gramatically incorrect. It should be: While I was waiting for the bus to leave, there was a man who came to talk to me.

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    Or perhaps better: While I was waiting...a man came to talk to me. – WS2 Dec 29 '14 at 10:36
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True, none of them is a complete sentence. But assuming they are meant as phrases: #2 is correct, #1 and #3 are grammatically incorrect. I don't know of any difference between American and British English in this matter.

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