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I have the following sentence:

I improved the usability of the company's website and optimized the website's rendering speeds.

Is there any way I can say this by using "company's website" only once? Thanks.

closed as off-topic by anongoodnurse, tchrist, Drew, andy256, Mr. Shiny and New 安宇 Dec 30 '14 at 15:47

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  • 2
    How about using its: I improved the usability of the company's website and optimized its rendering speeds. Or, rearrange. But if you're going for functionality over style (sometimes very important), just use its. – anongoodnurse Dec 28 '14 at 22:38
  • In addition to @rustytuba's nine suggestions, I'll add a tenth, which includes sentential syntax: "I improved the usability of the company's website and, what's more, I optimized its rendering speeds." Don – rhetorician Dec 28 '14 at 23:29
  • 1
    @medica Love the apostrophe taming. Happy New Year. – Edwin Ashworth Dec 29 '14 at 0:03
  • @EdwinAshworth - I had to think about it! But I'm slowly coming around. :D Happy New Year to you, too! – anongoodnurse Dec 29 '14 at 0:12
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    It's its and it's that it's hard to distinguish (without proper use of italics). – Edwin Ashworth Dec 29 '14 at 0:14
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If you believe that the verb "improve" can cover the meaning of "optimize", then you could write:

I improved both the usability and the rendering speeds of the company's website.

If not, then consider:

I improved the usability of the company's website and optimized the rendering speeds.

Or Medica's suggestion using a pronoun:

I improved the usability of the company's website and optimized its rendering speeds.

Then again, you could say:

To the company's website, I did the following: improved usability and optimized rendering speeds.

Or perhaps you'd prefer:

I made two changes to the company's website: improved the usability and optimized the rendering speeds.

If you'd like to emphasize how amazing it was that you accomplished both objectives, and you agree with Medica's pronoun suggestion, then perhaps:

Not only did I improve the usability of the company's website, but I also optimized its rendering speeds.

To give the sense that you're summarizing key changes, then try:

My changes to the website included improving usability and optimizing rendering speeds.

Or to focus on how fantastic the new-and-improved site is, you could say:

The company's website is now better because I improved the usability and optimized the rendering speeds.

And finally, if you wish to prompt a discussion about possessives or passive at ELU, you might try:

The company's website's usability has been improved and its rendering speeds optimized by me.

  • Great minds think alike, evidently. Since you've duplicated my tack (in other OPs' questions, that is), I'll not provide an answer to this OP's question. I will, however, make a tenth suggestion (you provided nine), which includes sentential syntax: "I improved the usability of the company's website and, what's more, I optimized its rendering speeds." Don – rhetorician Dec 28 '14 at 23:28

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