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I've heard these two sentences a lot "as you said " and "as you mentioned". I'm a bit confused about them. I want to ask: what's the difference between these two sentences:

"As he said before this car is a great choice for you"

"As he mentioned previously this car is a great choice for you"

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  • 1
    There's very little difference; perhaps 'mentioned' evokes a slightly more formal register. I'd include a comma after the comment clause. Dec 24 '14 at 11:39
  • mention: To mention something is to bring it up.
    – Misti
    Dec 24 '14 at 14:39
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'As you said' is more direct, and hence, can be more threatening.

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A fried of mine said :

they are the same, it does not matter which one you say. I usually use "as you mentioned EARLIER..." so i usually use it with past tenses. I use "as you said" in the present tense (example: as you just said, that will lead us to the same conclusion)

Mentioned is used with things like e-mails, speeches, etc...(as you mentioned in your e-mail/speech) and Mentioned is more formal and professional

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  • And "Like you mentioned" is wrong?
    – Bharata
    Aug 8 '18 at 22:05
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It's actually very simple:

"As he said before, my car's making a funny noise". -And- "As he mentioned before, his car is making a funny noise". (In this context they're nearly the same)

However, given a bit of context, these uses multiply a bit.

ie: If your context were to include something along the lines of "the boss mentioned were're all going to have to stay late tonight, but I'm not entirely sure what's going on yet". -VS- ie: If your context were to include something along the lines of "the boss mentioned were're all going to have to stay late tonight, but I'm not entirely sure what's going on yet".

...Now in sentance A, your imaginary coworker stated that they heard your boss state these things aloud, or without any real direction or authority, while in sentance B, your imaginary boss had actually "said" that this would happen, and you'd likely take the "" part of your "coworker's" statment as them not being aware of exactly 'why' you're staying late, rather than in the first sentance where the boss merely 'mentioned' that to someone (also, seeing as the boss 'mentioned' it, they could have very well been mumbeling to theirself, it could have been overheard, or even just 'mentioned' (more casually in this context) over lunch with some other employee that they may be staying late after work).

...Though in all honestly, the other commenters that have stated that these two words "are about the same" aren't nessisarily wrong; The meaning of these words (as so many are in the Emglish and Latin languages especially) are controlled primarily by context. Esentually anything written before and/or after those words influances the word in question.

I hope I was able to help with your question a bit! (I'm quite literally working on my new book this morning, and I mistakenly clicked onto this question, rather than a preferred grammar in literature and styles of writing article LOL. ...But I figured I'd contribute, hopefully it wasn't in vein.

Have a great day!

Best Regards, -Tenos (Corey)

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