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Is the sentence:

"We felt we had let our coach down because we hadn't won the match"

correct?

I read a sentence "We felt we had let our coach down because we didn't win the match" in an English textbook.

I wonder that, when we compare the happening time of the three things:
A "feel"
B "let our coach down" and
C "did not win the match"

it will be C> B> A.

So is it possible to say:

"We felt we had let our coach down because we hadn't won the match"

also?

If it is ok, too, are there any differences between the two sentences?

Thank you very much in advance.

1

I agree with the previous answer - both sentences are acceptable. It depends on how long ago this happened and what other events took place. 1. We felt we had let our coach down because we hadn't won the match before he took us to Spain for a training camp. 2. We felt we had let our coach down because we didn't win the match and now he is planning to take us to Spain for a training camp.

If you use the past perfect (had + past participle) it implies that the event happened prior to another event in the past. In this case, because no other past event is mentioned, the textbook example is preferable.

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I don't see anything obviously wrong with either sentence.

I would interpret the original as follows:

A: Feeling we let our coach down
B: Actually letting the coach down (gradually over the course of the game, rather than at the end)
C: Not winning

Then you have the order B, C, A, which strikes me as closer to reality. So I like the original slightly better than your version. But your version isn't wrong.

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