3

"I am off it"

What does this sentence mean generally? I am not well, interested etc?

closed as unclear what you're asking by TimLymington, 200_success, tchrist, FumbleFingers, anongoodnurse Dec 13 '14 at 5:43

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  • It's certainly not a well-established idiomatic usage. Can you give any more context? – FumbleFingers Dec 11 '14 at 22:39
  • This sounds a perfectly normal expression to me. I would use it to mean 'not interested in X at the moment', especially with a sense of being displeased about the thing. eg "I'm a bit off football [since it became more about money and less about sport]" or "I'm a bit off John [since he behaved like such a jerk the other day]." – Mynamite Dec 11 '14 at 23:24
  • I would interpret it to mean "I'm a bit ill," or "I'm not thinking clearly," or some such, depending on the circumstances. "I'm a bit off my game" is a better-known idiom meaning that you're not thinking clearly or perhaps not physically functioning well. – Hot Licks Dec 11 '14 at 23:31
  • As recently edited, of course, the phrase could mean that the person is off drugs or off booze (or off Stack Exchange) -- kicked some sort of habit. Or simply he has discontinued taking antibiotics or some such. Or off a task force at work. Loads of possible meanings. – Hot Licks Dec 20 '14 at 15:37
1

Depending on the context it can mean unwell, unfit, or more likely from the sentence given, stopped liking sth.

The American Heritage Dictionary says

...

adj.

...

  1. No longer taking place; canceled: The wedding is off.

...

6.

a. Not up to standard; below a normal or satisfactory level: Your pitching is off today.

b. Not accurate; incorrect: Your statistical results are off.

c. Somewhat crazy; eccentric: I think that person is a little off.

While not mentioned above, the example is in the vein of 6a and 6c.

It could also mean nearby, as in

We live just off the main street.

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