-1

Understanding this sentence does, of course, rely heavily on the contextual information provided by my essay. However, I am unsure if I have punctuated this sentence correctly or at all in the right way in either of my three options:

  1. Although he does clarify the qualifications of 'reasonable rejection' and 'informed, unforced general agreement'; for present purposes, we can simplify his account of morality by understanding it in terms of justifiability: what establishes whether something is right or wrong is whether it can be justified.

  1. Although he does clarify the qualifications of 'reasonable rejection and 'informed, unforced general agreement, for the present purposes, we can simplify his account of morality by understand it in terms of justifiability: what establishes whether something is right or wrong is whether it can be justified.

  1. Although he does clarify the qualifications of 'reasonal rejection and 'informed, unforced agreement,' for the present purposes; we can simplify his account we can simplify his account of morality by understand it in terms of justifiability- what establishes whether something is right or wrong is whether it can be justified
  • In any case, it should be by understanding. In two cases you wrote by understand, but that seems to really break your sentence. – oerkelens Dec 1 '14 at 14:39
  • Sorry @oerkelens, I have no idea what you mean. Please elaborate. – philosophyislife Dec 1 '14 at 14:42
  • by understand is wrong. by understanding is correct. In sentence one, you wrote it correctly. In sentence two it is not correct. There is no deeper meaning than that :) – oerkelens Dec 1 '14 at 14:52
  • (3) is right out. The suspended hyphen makes zero sense. You probably meant to use an unsuspended dash. – RegDwigнt Dec 1 '14 at 16:31
2

IMO, none of these sentences is punctuated properly. The first comes closest. I've used it as a model. First, I question the use of single quotation marks: normally they would be double quotation marks, but perhaps that is a style decision, so I will leave them. Second, the semi-colon is incorrect; a simple comma will do (and yes, my use of a semi-colon there is a bit ironic). Changing it to a comma also does away with the messiness of having to place the punctuation outside or inside the quote mark--it slips neatly inside.

Although he does clarify the qualifications of 'reasonable rejection' and 'informed, unforced general agreement,' for present purposes, we can simplify his account of morality by understanding it in terms of justifiability: what establishes whether something is right or wrong is whether it can be justified.

  • Putting the comma after agreement before the ending quote mark looks very strange, to me. – Greg Lee Mar 3 '15 at 3:39

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