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In an example sentence, what would be the correct form of using "the same way":

Sell your fruit the same way Walgreens does.

or

Sell your fruit the same way as Walgreens.

I'm leaning towards the first one but only by ear, I don't have a grammatical explanation for it.

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    Either is fine. – Robusto Nov 30 '14 at 20:00
  • The as is a version of that (which is also OK) used with the same way to introduce a relative clause. Since it's a way (i.e, a manner adverb), it can't be the subject, so it's deletable. Hence, all three are grammatical and mean the same thing (i.e, all are equally correct, none is more correct than any other): the same way Walgreen's does, the same way that Walgreen's does, the same way as Walgreen's does. – John Lawler Nov 30 '14 at 20:27
  • @JohnLawler So you're saying that "Sell your fruit the same way as Walgreens." is in fact incorrect because it misses a verb? I'm not debating whether "as" is redundant but that if it's used, "does" has to be used as well. – eagerMoose Nov 30 '14 at 20:42
  • No, that isn't what I'm saying. I didn't mention deleting the pro-verb does and I didn't delete it because I wasn't discussing it. If you do delete it, of course, you can still use as, and you can still use Zero, but you can't use that. – John Lawler Nov 30 '14 at 21:38
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I prefer the first, because "the same way" is adverbial, and needs to point to a verb. "Walgreens" is not a "way". That said, most people would not object to your second rendering; as Jan Borchardt pointed out, they will catch the implied but unspoken/unwritten verb (does).

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  • Is this one of those things that became "correct" because of how frequently it's used? – eagerMoose Dec 1 '14 at 19:15
  • I suppose so. Although I am not a descriptivist; that is, I don't think simple repetition necessarily makes something correct. You can Google and see how often a phrasing (or a spelling) is used, but I would also recommend consulting a dictionary; it's entirely possible for the majority of web users to get something wrong. Including answerers on this site. – Brian Hitchcock Dec 5 '14 at 11:27
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The second is correct. There is a lot of the phrase left out, but is understood. Sell your fruit the same way THAT Walgreens does. (SELLS THEIR FRUIT) The words in caps are the words that are understood, but not spoken.

Based on my experience learning English grammar, Latin grammar, French, Spanish and German, too.

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