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Basically, the second sentence seems horribly clumsy to me. I've spent so long looking at it that I have a mental block of how to change it.

So, an act could be seen as wrong owing to a different account of morality such as that of Kant’s or even utilitarianism. Even with this considered, Scanlon must accept that what follows from his explicit claim about what makes an act wrong is that wrong acts are wrong because they are unjustifiable to others.

The phrase even with this considered does not sound right at all to me but I can't think of how to express it differently.

  • You might prefer "Notwithstanding that, ..." or any of the other suggested answers to this related question: english.stackexchange.com/questions/210779/… – Dan Bron Nov 30 '14 at 15:16
  • At last, that is the perfect word replacement. Thank you, that is exactly what I was looking to express. – philosophyislife Nov 30 '14 at 15:19
  • "In spite of this..." is another option. – Hot Licks Nov 30 '14 at 15:23
  • "Taking this into consideration" – Christopher Nov 30 '14 at 17:43
  • "Even taking this into account . . ." – Robusto Nov 30 '14 at 17:57
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The easiest way to simplify the phrase that bothers you is to change "Even with this considered," to "Even so,"—but I suspect that you shied away from that option because the paragraph already begins with "So." In my view, you would achieve a better overall result by changing that first "So" to "Therefore," or "Thus," or "Consequently," and then using the natural-sounding "Even so" to open the next sentence:

Thus, an act could be seen as wrong owing to a different account of morality such as that of Kant’s or even utilitarianism. Even so, Scanlon must accept that what follows from his explicit claim about what makes an act wrong is that wrong acts are wrong because they are unjustifiable to others.

If you feel that the "Even so" transition needs a bit more ballast, you can add however to it: "Even so, however, Scanlon..."

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That said, Scanlon must accept that what follows from his explicit...

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So, an act could be seen as wrong owing to a different account of morality such as that of Kant’s or even utilitarianism. Even with this considered, Scanlon must accept that what follows from his explicit claim about what makes an act wrong is that wrong acts are wrong because they are unjustifiable to others.

Instead, you could write:

... Even having considered this, Scanlon must accept...

If you're trying to drop the 'even:'

... When considering this fact, Scanlon must accept...to others, despite the fact being in his favor.

Although, personally, I'd re-word a portion of the sentence, as follows (where [...] denotes optionality/preference and (...) denotes a choice of the contents):

Scanlon must accept that what follows from his explicit claim[,] about what makes an act wrong[,] is that wrong acts are so, (simply, solely, mainly) because they are unjustifiable to others, regardless of what morality a person may seem to have.

I cannot, however, make a perfect sentence, due to my lack of knowledge on said subject. I hope this helps!

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Begin the first sentence with 'though'; remove the words, "Even with this considered," and "about what makes an act wrong,"; merge what remains of both sentences together:

Though an act could be seen as wrong - owing to a different account of morality such as that of Kant’s or even utilitarianism - Scanlon must accept that what follows from his explicit claim is that wrong acts are wrong, because they are unjustifiable to others.

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