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Is the phrase "Flesh of the god" grammatically and semantically acceptable, or should it be "Flesh of the gods"?

I am writing an article and I'd like to use it for the title. I am from Finland, so I really don't know if this is the correct way to say this.

I'm speaking about any god. In my article, I'm describing a man as if he were a god. He's a normal human being, but he's placed himself upon a pedestal so as to be worshipped as a god. The story then goes on to say that someone kills this man and cuts off a piece of his flesh.

If I used the definite article, "the" before god, would it imply a specific god? Should I use an uppercase letter for "God"? What do you think "Flesh of the god" means? I mean, how would this story go, if the title were "Flesh of the god"?

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    How can we possibly know what you mean by the phrase you don't know how to say unless you supply a context and explain what you expect to convey by those words? – Robusto Nov 28 '14 at 14:13
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    Are you talking about more than one god? Only one? Any god, or one in particular? Or even God with a capital G? – Andrew Leach Nov 28 '14 at 14:23
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    Still not very clear, but it may be you mean 'god in human form' or something similar. If so no, this is quite wrong. Flesh of the gods would be a tangible substance; Christians might consider the phrase flesh of god a blasphemous reference to the consecrated Host. – TimLymington Nov 28 '14 at 18:22
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    @Mari-LouA If I would use "the" before god, it would be specific god? And then one should use Uppercase letters for "God"? – Mirian Dec 1 '14 at 12:24
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    @MirjaLahtinen, either way is ok. It's (IMO) a better title without the leading "the", because it's briefer and slightly more ambiguous whether you're using 'flesh' figuratively or literally (which makes it more interesting IMO). But that's a matter of personal style/preference really. – A E Dec 1 '14 at 13:39
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It sounds from the comments as though you mean literally meat (for eating) made from a dead god (or someone posing as a god).

If that's the case then "the flesh of the god" does make sense as a title. It is somewhat ambiguous, but it sounds as though the story itself resolves that ambiguity. So it's ambiguous in an interesting way.

It's (IMO) a better title without the leading "the", because it's briefer and slightly more ambiguous whether you're using 'flesh' figuratively or literally (which makes it more interesting IMO). But that's a matter of personal style/preference really.

The ambiguity will be between:

The soft substance consisting of muscle and fat that is found between the skin and bones of a human or an animal

versus

The human body and its physical needs and desires, especially as contrasted with the mind or the soul

ODO: flesh

versus

II. Extended and figurative uses (chiefly of Biblical origin).

  1. one's (own) flesh : one's near kindred or descendants. Now rare exc. in flesh and blood n.

with a hint of

9 c. The body (of Christ) regarded as spiritually ‘eaten’ by believers; also applied mystically to the bread in the sacrament of the Lord's Supper.

OED: flesh

So a reader encountering it for the first time could be unsure whether you mean "kindred of the gods" or "meat made from a god" or "remarkably good meat", and there's also the slightly unsettling implication of a reference of transubstantiation. Which on the whole makes it a good title in my opinion, because (if I understand correctly) you intend both of those first two meanings.

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"The flesh of the god" refers to the flesh of a specific god as you are using the definite article "the". "the god" means that there's a particular god the identity of which should be known to the reader/listener within this context.

To refer to the flesh of a non-specific god, you would use the indefinite article "a": "the flesh of a god". In this case, nothing is being said about the identity of the god.

You might also treat "god" as a modifier of "flesh" or create a compound to get "god flesh", "godflesh" respectively.

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