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What does joll mean in the following sentence?

... give him the upper or right hand, and walk not just even with him cheek be joll, but a little behind him, yet not so distant as that it shall be troublesome to him to speak to thee,...

Source: Rules for Childrens Behaviour ...

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    @FumbleFingers if it is an archaic spelling, why is it still off topic? Saying that, it would be useful to know where the sentence came from. I suppose I could Google it... Done: wwnorton.com/college/english/nael/18century/topic_1/behave.htm – Mari-Lou A Nov 27 '14 at 18:29
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    @FumbleFingers I don't have access to the Oxford English Dictionary, does that mean I can't ask questions about the meanings of archaic words? – Mari-Lou A Nov 27 '14 at 18:39
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    @FumbleFingers and perhaps the OP is unfamiliar with the word jowl itself? For a non-native speaker joll could have been joal, or gioll for all they knew. If you are unfamiliar with its modern-day spelling, and its meaning, it's not unreasonable that the OP asks the question. – Mari-Lou A Nov 27 '14 at 19:01
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    Guys, the probable source (dated 1701, see below) is interesting in that it's basically written in modern English, with this phrase as an exception. – A E Nov 27 '14 at 19:25
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    @A.E: I see "Put not thy hand in the presence of others to any part of thy body, not ordinarily discovered" in the list of strictures. Not exactly "modern" English, but the sentiment itself doubtless still occurs to many today (when watching crotch-clutching rappers on stage, for example). – FumbleFingers Nov 27 '14 at 20:30
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It's the phrase 'cheek by jowl', which the OED lists under the entry for 'cheek':

5.a. cheek by jowl; †cheek by cheek (In 6–7 cheek(e to jowl, by chole, jole, joll, gig(g by geoul, jowl, 7–8 jig(g by jowl, 9 cheek by chowl, for chowl, and jowl, Sc. cheek-for-chow, dial. jig-by-jow.) Side by side; in the closest intimacy.

It's also listed under 'jowl | jole' (n1):

1.a. A jawbone, a ‘chaft’; a jaw; esp. the under jaw; pl. Jaws.

  1. Here perhaps belongs the phrase cheek by jowl, in earlier usage cheek by cheek: see cheek n. 5a. In this the j form is known from 1577, which is somewhat earlier than it is known in sense 1 above. The 17th c. variants cheek by chole, chowl, agree in form better with jowl n.2 or . But it is probable that, by the time the phrase came into use, all three ns. were already felt as one. The following examples supplement those under cheek n.

and that refers to 'jowl | jole' (n2):

The external throat or neck when fat or prominent; the pendulous flesh extending from the chops to the throat of a fat person, forming a ‘double’ chin; the dewlap of cattle; the crop or the wattle of a bird, etc.;

So the OED seems to be uncertain as to whether the 'jowl' in 'cheek by jowl' refers to the jaw, the neck, or the roll of fat which makes a 'double chin' - or even perhaps 'head'.

But 'walking cheek by jowl' definitely means walking very close together.

This is from The School of Manners, I'm guessing?

Walking with thy Superior in the house or Garden, give him the upper or righthand, and walk not just even with him cheek be joll, but a little behind him, yet not so distant as that it shall be troublesome to him to speak to thee, or hard for thee to hear.

So Garretson is saying, when you're walking with someone more important than you, don't walk side-by-side with them as if you were their best buddy, instead walk a little bit behind them (but not so far behind that it's a pain in the arse for them to talk to you).

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This appears to be an old spelling of the still-current expression cheek by jowl, meaning "close together", or "right next to each other".

Jowl is not common outside that expression, but it does still exist, and means "The external throat or neck when fat or prominent; the pendulous flesh extending from the chops to the throat of a fat person, forming a ‘double’ chin" (OED). It is most often used in writing, in a description of a character, particularly something like with heavy jowls.

  • It’s also quite common in the US (particularly in the South) as hog jowl. The word always makes me think of angry Ankuras, jowls aquiver and saliva aflutter. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Nov 27 '14 at 18:48
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Perhaps "jowl", as in cheek by jowl?

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