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I'm translating titles of paragraphs from Japanese to English. A pragmatic translation of the titles can be: "Before Receiving Inquiries from Potential Customers" and "After Receiving Inquiries from Potential Customers". Underneath each title there is a description of the processes of what to do before and after contact with potential customers. I would like to make the titles as natural as possible and am considering changing them to:

"Pre-Customer Inquiry" and "Post-Customer Inquiry"

Including the use of the dash, do the above sound natural to native speakers? Or should I stick to the original pragmatic translation. Thank you for your help.

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    Hmm, the way the titles read now, without the additional information provided by your introduction, indicate to me "Inquires from people who are not yet customers" and "Inquires from people who used to be customers", respectively. That is, the "Pre-" and "Post-" seem to attach to customer, instead of inquiry. For that reason, I prefer your pragmatic translations. – Dan Bron Nov 27 '14 at 11:02
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Dan Bron's comment is apropos, although this is a common problem when attaching a prefix to a phrase where the key word is not the first word, and often the users will be able to make sense from context. However, a reasonabe compromise would be to use

Before Customer Inquiry

After Customer Inquiry

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You say, "I would like to make the titles as natural as possible". In that case, leave them as you had them originally. You will not do yourself any favors by trying to shorten the expression through just the use of pre-/post- in place of before/after.

It is in any case presumably the receiving that pre- and post- would apply to, not the customers or the inquiries. On the other hand, you also speak about before and after contact with the customer.

In sum, keep it simple (and natural): "Before Receiving Inquiries from Potential Customers" and "After Receiving Inquiries from Potential Customers". (Or "Before Customer Contact" etc.)

If you must shorten the expressions (e.g., to save space in a user interface) the try something like Before Contact/After Contact.

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