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If a have a sentence: "A depends on B", then I can describe A as a "dependent" (adj.). How can I describe B with one adjective?

marked as duplicate by FumbleFingers single-word-requests Nov 27 '14 at 13:46

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    "B is necessary for A" – Dan Bron Nov 27 '14 at 10:32
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I think this relation is more normally described using nouns rather than adjectives: Depender A has a dependency on dependee B. Right now, I can't think of an adjective that you can use for the dependee in the same way that you can use dependent for the depender. Other than using dependee itself in this way, which is a bit awkward.

I think in computing the word dependency is in the process of changing its meaning so that it can actually mean dependee as well. This is because dependency relations in that context are almost always seen from the point of view of the depender, making a dependency essentially the same thing as a dependee. And in this context people universally use the term dependency rather than dependee. In a computing context this is probably the more acceptable term, even in attributive use. (E.g. "dependency project", not "dependee project".)

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If A depends on B then B is a prerequisite for A. It can be an adjective, too.

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