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I viewed the thread about conniption dido - which I'd never heard before. But was wondering what true meaning of conniption was? I always figured it was an old medical term for seizure or something.

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    Good question, though I fear we’re not likely to get an authoritative answer. When both etymonline and the OED give up and just like vague possibilities (an alleged dialect word canapshus or a corruption of, well, corruption), our chances of outdoing them seem slim to me. But we have managed to get lucky in such regards before! – Janus Bahs Jacquet Nov 22 '14 at 16:37
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    I don't think it's exactly an "old medical term" - more of a rather quaint AmE slang term for tantrum, about on a par with "hissy fit". OED lists it as US vulgar, first recorded 1833. – FumbleFingers Nov 22 '14 at 16:37
  • Possible duplicate:english.stackexchange.com/questions/117739/… – user66974 Nov 22 '14 at 20:55
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    The question is unclear: The title asks for the origin. The body asks for the meaning. – Drew Nov 23 '14 at 2:40
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    @Josh61 That almost-duplicate is specifically asking about the dido part, not conniption. – Barmar Nov 24 '14 at 21:21
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The meaning of "conniption" is "a fit of rage or hysterics."

The etymology of "conniption" is unclear. Many sources note that the first appearance of this word is in 1833 but no one has yet found the source of the word. There is a good, short review of this subject here:

http://etymologynow.blogspot.com/2010/03/etymology-of-conniption-fit.html

with a few more interesting details.

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