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It strikes me that the way we use 'with' is more complex than we may think. So I have two questions:

  • Can the preposition 'with' be used to mean 'about' or 'in relation to'? (sentence a and b). And also:
  • Can the preposition 'with' be used as 'among' (sentence b)

a) ... because in a moment, we need to get back to my point with Eliot

b) He has become very popular with the people

c) The world has not responded in ways similar to what we have seen with other crises like the Hawaiian earthquake

These sentences are taken from public lectures 'with' well established writers and political commentators.

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When you say "sentences "a" and "b"" I gather you mean sentences "a" and "c".

"...because in a moment, we need to get back to my point with Eliot."

"...similar to what we have seen with other crises like the Hawaiian earthquake."

Yes, it means "in relation to", "concerning", "regarding".

"He has become very popular with the people."

here it means "among", "in the same group as".

"At the beginning of his carreer, Bob Dylan was very popular with the College crowd."

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