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I have noticed that most often a relative pronoun such as who, which, etc. is used to further inform the reader about its preceding noun or noun phrase, e.g.

1-Do you know the girl who is talking to Tom?[1]
2. I told you about the woman who lives next door.[2]
3. The man who did this is the brother of our neighbour, Mr. Smith. [3]

In both statements above, the precedes the noun, i.e. girl and woman, respectively. But, my question is:
Are relative clauses always a justification for using the definite article "the" before their antecedent?
For instance, in the following statement, individuals is not specifically known of in the context, and thus the only introduction for that comes in its relative clause who had not taken part.... Has the been used correctly here? Or should it be omitted?

... and providing questionnaires to the individuals who had not taken part in the coordination meeting of Khuzestan soccer referees

References:
-1 and 2, http://www.ego4u.com/en/cram-up/grammar/relative-clauses
-3, Tipping, L., Matriculation English Grammar, 1967

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    When the noun is plural, I think the becomes optional, but there's a slightly different connotation. I told you about people who eat seafood. – Barmar Nov 5 '14 at 23:15
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The usage of "the" usually pertains to nouns and/or subjects which are specific or definite. In the sentence "... and providing questionnaires to the individuals who had not taken part in the coordination meeting of Khuzestan soccer referees", using "the" implies that there was a specific group of individuals who had not taken part. If "the" was left out the sentence would have been a general statement referring to unspecified individuals.

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