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When reality agrees with my prejudices, they get __. What's the right word?

For example: "I had long been prejudiced against city-dwellers as wayward and spendthrift; and when I saw the lust and lucre of New Delhi, my prejudices were __."

5 Answers 5

9

I had long been prejudiced against city-dwellers as wayward and spendthrift; and when I saw the lust and lucre of New Delhi, my prejudices were . . .

1) justified
2) confirmed

Prejudices are not 'fulfilled', because a prejudice is an opinion.

I had long been prejudiced against city-dwellers as wayward and spendthrift; and when I saw the lust and lucre of New Delhi, I saw that my prejudices were ...

1) valid
2) reasonable
3) not unfounded/baseless

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  • @mplungjan It's quite not so.
    – apaderno
    Apr 12, 2011 at 7:38
  • @mplung: Chances are that he didn't. Besides the answers being posted just 40 seconds apart, that simply doesn't happen on this kind of site. Apr 12, 2011 at 7:40
  • No, I did not copy it. I got the alert that "1 more answer has been posted" just before I was about to hit my POST button. Apr 12, 2011 at 7:53
  • 1
    calm down ladies
    – jsj
    Apr 12, 2011 at 8:43
  • someone just had their prejudices confirmed
    – Mitch
    Apr 12, 2011 at 13:45
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Your prejudices were reinforced or vindicated.

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  • 1
    I think 'reinforced' is a better word in this context than 'vindicated'. Apr 12, 2011 at 7:59
  • It depends on what you want to say. To say that your prejudices were reinforced is neutral or a bit negative toward the content of those prejudices. To say that they are vindicated is to take an opinionated stance in support of those prejudices: it says they were proven correct. Apr 12, 2011 at 8:51
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  • Affirmed
  • Confirmed
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  • 1
    I don't think affirm is appropriate here because it is something a person does: state emphatically or publicly
    – z7sg Ѫ
    Apr 12, 2011 at 10:53
  • 1
    confirmed sounds better
    – Mitch
    Apr 12, 2011 at 13:44
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  • Justified?
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Confirmed for a rather inflexible answer; justified implying a slightly less definite conclusion; appropriate suggesting they were not unfounded; reinforced, bolstered, supported, strengthened implying they were added to; correct if you want to appear more reactionary. Cobmbinations of words may fit better - sadly true, not unfounded, not without cause etc etc.

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