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Can you explain the meaning of laborious comprises phrase in the text below. This paragraph is the 1st paragraph in http://www.all-art.org/art_20th_century/magritte1.html

My issue is actually the comprises word.

Longman and some other several dictionaries didn't help me

best regards

The union of these two ethnic groups, with their so utterly incompatible mentalities, made it necessary to constantly reach laborious comprises, leading to legal and administrative complications of such a nature that they tended more to deepen the quarrel s than to settle them.

closed as off-topic by anongoodnurse, James Waldby - jwpat7, aedia λ, Chenmunka, Ellie Kesselman Nov 5 '14 at 2:13

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    It's a typo. It should read compromises. That should make a lot more sense. – ElendilTheTall Nov 3 '14 at 14:37
  • ok I got it now. Can you transform your comment to answer and let me accept it then. regards, thanks. – André Chénier Nov 3 '14 at 14:42
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    This question appears to be off-topic because it is about a typo for "compromise". – anongoodnurse Nov 3 '14 at 18:18
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I agree with Elendil's comment. If you replace "comprises" with "compromises" it makes a lot more sense.

The two ethnic groups had to make compromises:

The settlement of differences by arbitration or by consent reached by mutual concessions.

which were difficult to reach and thus laborious:

Toilsome; (...) mentally difficult.

(Definitions from Wiktionary)

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