-1

The example is taken from page 1 of this PDF ; The National Admissions Test for Law (LNAT):

You may find, however, that answering one question helps you answer the next, not least for the purposes of elimination as well as general understanding of the subject matter and the structure of the main and subsidiary arguments.

User AmeliaBR's answer states:

The phrase you quote for not least can't be replaced directly with notably, because it is not really comparing equivalent parts of speech of which one is not least: not least is followed by a phrase that starts with "for" ("for the purposes of") but the alternative ("general understanding") isn't introduced with "for". To be clear: The phrase is grammatically poor even with not least, switching to notably only emphasizes the problem, it doesn't create it.

What are the problems here? Can 'for' follow notably? Why or why not? Google Books produces many results for 'notably for', so this appears justified?

  • Personally, I find both phrasings not well-stated. Substituting "if for no other reason than that" for "not least for" would help, but even then is still not ideal. Very long sentences oftentimes are best served by breaking them up into multiple sentences. – Sylas Seabrook Oct 26 '14 at 4:43
  • Grammar/phrasing aside, the logic is incorrect. If one answers a question incorrectly instead of noting that one does not know the answer, the error may be propagated to future questions. Law & logic do not always mix, lol. – Sylas Seabrook Oct 26 '14 at 4:44
  • 5
    For the broader question, a simpler answer: synonyms need not be, and generally are not, interchangeable. Each has its distinct or subtly different implication and usage. – Kris Oct 26 '14 at 7:40
  • You may prefer the ELL site for some English questions. – Fattie Oct 26 '14 at 8:33
0

The passage may be better written (and understood) as:

You may find, however, that answering one question helps you answer the next. This not only helps in the elimination of possible answers in subsequent questions, but also for a general understanding of the subject matter and the structure of the main and subsidiary arguments.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.