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Is there a difference between "headquarters of" and "headquarters for"?

  • It is the headquarters of many branches.
  • It is the headquarters for many branches.
  • It is the headquarters of the party.
  • It is the headquarters for the party.

Intuitively, "for many branches" seems correct and "of the party" seems correct. I can explain the conceptual difference between branches and party, but I can't connect my intuition to any rules. Any thoughts on this? Thanks.

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Your intuition is correct. Speaking about a bank and its branches.

It is the headquarters for the United Bank of Ohio. Use for when speaking of the institution as a whole.

It is the headquarters of the northern district branches of the United Bank of Ohio. Use of when speaking of a part of the institution.

  • Those are the opposite of my examples. If we think of "of" as possessive, then "headquarters of the United Bank of Ohio" parallels "United Bank of Ohio's headquarters," which seems okay to me... – Chris Oct 25 '14 at 7:30

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