3

In the last episode of "Once Upon a Time" (S04E04 - The Apprentice) there was this dialog:

Girl: Well, I don't pillage and plunder on the first date, just so you know.
Man: Well, that's because you haven't been out with me yet.

I didn't understand meaning of this phrase: "I don't pillage and plunder on the first date"

I searched google but can't find anything related to this context.

Can someone explain it?

closed as off-topic by anongoodnurse, Lynn, tchrist, Kris, Canis Lupus Oct 23 '14 at 6:04

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions that can be answered using commonly-available references are off-topic. A list of these references can be found here: List of general references" – anongoodnurse, Lynn, tchrist, Kris, Canis Lupus
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • 1
    Just look up the words one at a time. Good luck. – Kris Oct 23 '14 at 2:55
  • 2
    Hi, and welcome to ELU. Questions that can be answered using commonly-available references are off-topic. A list of these references can be found here: List of general references. Please take a few minutes to take the site tour and visit the help center for guidance on how to use this site. – anongoodnurse Oct 23 '14 at 3:09
  • 2
    I am sure @medica's intention is not to humiliate but rather to teach the proper use of the site. A general reference would be pillage and plunder. You might also be interested in this question. If there's something about the straightforward definition you do not understand, you can add that to your question. – Lynn Oct 23 '14 at 3:32
  • 2
    @Lynn thank you but I was already looked these links. But I couldn't fit them into this context – user95347 Oct 23 '14 at 3:36
  • 2
    Vikings and pirates were infamous for their plundering and pillaging while invading the shores of England. These acts were usually accompanied with rapings. Hence in the collective imagination "pillage and plunder" is often associated with forced intercourse/rape/wild wanton sex depending on your frame of mind and sensitivity. – Mari-Lou A Oct 23 '14 at 4:23
3

First of all, I wish to use my first sentence to apologize for the rather unfriendly comments from certain users on this site, to which I, at least, bid you welcome. The phrase pillage and plunder has to my knowledge no special, idiomatic meaning that would fit here. I think that is your answer. However, in the present context, the most reasonable interpretation seems to me to be that the girl will not have sex on the first date: a metaphor.

  • 1
    Perhaps an immediate understanding of this metaphor jumps more quickly to the mind of someone who sees the underlying shared and extended meaning in raptō/raptāre/raptāvī/raptātum than it does to those who do not, rapists and raptors not being so far off in origin. – tchrist Oct 23 '14 at 4:09
  • The Man's response: "Well, that's because you haven't been out with me yet." clearly indicates his pirate role to steal her treasure. – skullpatrol Oct 23 '14 at 4:11
  • 1
    @tchrist: Yes, that is a good point. From rapio. Feel free to add that to my answer if you're in the mood. – Cerberus Oct 23 '14 at 4:14
  • 2
    Sorry. You already noted it's no idiom, at least not in this case. That leaves litcrit, which is what you presented -- but is off-topic. – Kris Oct 23 '14 at 5:13
  • 2
    @Kris: No: the question whether or not this is idiomatic is a valid question with a clear answer. (As to "literary criticism", this is not about literature anyway, nor is it criticism.) – Cerberus Oct 23 '14 at 16:28