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Is it correct to put a full stop after signing emails. For example should it be

Regards,

Cristiano

or

Regards,

Cristiano.

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  • 1
    Hey, it's your email, you get to choose (though I've not seen anyone do that before, in my own experience).
    – Dan Bron
    Oct 22, 2014 at 19:31
  • Depends on your background. I have a colleague who is a native French speaker and includes a full stop after his name. It is common in French to do so. For example, they also usually put full stops after headings. Oct 22, 2014 at 19:37

4 Answers 4

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As has already been stated, I believe this is more a matter of preference than a matter of correctness. However, my personal experience is that the more professional you want your email to look, the more you will tend to emulate established styles for letter formatting (often Block Format).

Here is a link to a few other examples of letter formatting--none of the examples use a full stop after the signature.


4

Omitting the period after the sender's name will not raise any eyebrows and online searches reflect that it's the prevalent e-mail etiquette.

E-mail punctuation in my opinion is more a matter of style choice than punctuation rules.

       Regards,
      Cristiano
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A few people, on a related thread, noted that people from Europe put a hard stop after first name.

I am from Europe (Russia) and I do add a period after my name in the signature. In addition to following my culture's business etiquette, I intentionally place it there to portray confidence and strength, and even as a way to end that conversation politely yet firmly.

However, when in Rome, do like the Romans do. That's everything I had to say on this matter.

Love,
Natasha.

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1st version is correct, without period.

Regards,

Arsen

Since there are no any general rules restricting the content or the formatting of the signature, I consider 'correct' to refer to the most frequently used and adopted by many legal entities style. See netiquette for some general info, but, again, no strict limitations.

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    Your answer would be improved by reference to external sources or authority; or, lacking that, providing your personal rationale.
    – Dan Bron
    Oct 22, 2014 at 19:36

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