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When I normally use "perhaps" (or "maybe") and want to emphasize it, I put it the beginning of the sentence.

Perhaps a better approach is to save the status of the button and restore it.

Now, I want to use a connection ("However") in the same phrase but it seems to me wrong to use "approach" also in the beginning.

So is it correct to put it following the verb? It also sound strange to me.

However, a better approach is perhaps to save the status of the button and restore it.

Is it better to let it in the beginning?

However, perhaps a better approach is to save the status of the button and restore it.

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    Better, or 'Perhaps, however, ...'. Using two reasonably closely related types of words may jar some people's sensitivities; 'However, a better approach may be to save the status of the button and restore it' avoids the juxtaposition. Oct 16, 2014 at 10:21
  • You could alternatively move however like so: Perhaps a better approach, however, is to save the status of the button and restore it. Oct 16, 2014 at 14:54
  • If you use the edit button and fiddle about with a full stop or something my name will disappear from under your post! Oct 16, 2014 at 14:55
  • Thanks to both. @Araucaria I don't care having your name as editor of my question.
    – PhoneixS
    Oct 20, 2014 at 7:49
  • @EdwinAshworth I think you comment can be an answer.
    – PhoneixS
    Oct 20, 2014 at 7:50

1 Answer 1

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You only need to move the perhaps by a few words. Done. "However, a better approach, perhaps, ..."

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