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There are two sentences. I do not know which is better in grammar. Is there any difference?

  1. Vegetables are good for health, which can be found in many areas in this country.

  2. Vegetables are good for health and can be found in many areas in this country.

closed as off-topic by phenry, FumbleFingers, Chenmunka, aedia λ, Edwin Ashworth Oct 15 '14 at 23:23

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If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Welcome to ELU. Both sentences are entirely grammatical, but I suspect that you want to express a particular idea. Please edit this question to say what it is that you want your chosen sentence to mean. Asking "Which is grammatical" is proof-reading and unhelpful. – Andrew Leach Oct 15 '14 at 17:31
  • @Andrew I’d say both sentences are ungrammatical: health requires some kind of determiner to work here. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Oct 15 '14 at 17:35
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The first sentence means that the fact that vegetables are good for health can be found in many areas of the country. It is confusing.

If you have two ideas in the sentence and you join them with which and you put a comma before it, then the second part of the sentence refers to the meaning of the whole first part of the sentence. For example:

Me and my friends always eat lots of vegetables, which is good for our health.

The sentence number two is fine and clear.

  • Actually, I want to use "which" to indicate "vegetables" in the first sentence. – Zhiwu Li Oct 15 '14 at 17:26
  • @ZhiwuLi You can’t. Not the way the sentence is currently phrased, at least. Relative markers like that and which always refer back to the last possible element before them. Which can refer back to either a noun phrase or an entire clause. That means that it can refer to two possible things in your example: “Vegetables are good for your health” (clause) or “health” (noun phrase). In other words, you’re either saying that you can find your health in many areas in the country or that you can find that vegetables are good for your health in many areas in the country. Neither works. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Oct 15 '14 at 17:40
  • Yes you are right. I am clear now. – Zhiwu Li Oct 15 '14 at 17:50
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Second sentence is much better.

1 Vegetables are good for health, which [health??] can be found in many areas in this country.
2 Vegetables are good for health and [vegetables] can be found in many areas in this country.

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If you are writing it, why not:

Vegetables, which/that are good for health ,can be found in many areas in this country.

  • That changes the meaning to 'Those vegetables which are good for health can be found in many ...'. You need commas round which are good for health. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 15 '14 at 18:46

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