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I want a word but I don't want to have to use "more successful". I don't consider successfuler a suitable attempt in the context I want to use it in either.

I think this is called a comparative adverb, but I don't know of a thesaurus of comparative adverbs. Can anyone point me to that? Failing that, has anyone got ideas for an aspirational word that could replace "more successful"?

  • successful is not an adverb, it's an adjective. I suggest looking up a suitable synonym of this word in any dictionary online, and then simply use its comparative form. – Vilmar Oct 15 '14 at 12:28
  • The phrase "more successful" is what I am referring to as a comparative adverb. From a Google "define:comparative adverb" search "comparative adverb - an adverb that compares two actions and is formed by adding –er to the end or more/less to the beginning of a regular adverb. rmfs1.ortn.edu/myschool/mcain/Web/Grammar Flashcards.mht" – James Oct 15 '14 at 15:11
  • I understand that you refer to "more successful" as a comparative adverb, but it is not, it is a comparative adjective. – Vilmar Oct 15 '14 at 15:20
  • Yeah, I realise that now @vilmar, thanks. I just feel too constrained at present by having to use "more" first - it's for a motto and it ruins the flow at the moment. The comparative forms of too many words seem to require it. – James Oct 15 '14 at 15:22
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Successful is an adjective, while succesfully is the adverb form of it. Maybe a replacement for 'more successful' could be 'of greater success' or 'better/more achieved'. If the context of 'successful' deals more with money and/or position, than also consider 'wealthier', 'more aristocratic', and 'better titled'.

I'm probably not the best person to listen to for this though. Looking up synonyms for 'successful' on thesaurus.com or any other website for yourself would be your best route.

  • Thanks Arturo. I'm looking for a one word replacement. Some words have a suitable "er" ending, such as safe->safer, but right now I've got successful->"more successful". – James Oct 15 '14 at 15:16

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