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Which term should I use when I want to buy a ticket from A to B for a scheduled bus, similar to what flight means for planes?

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    I'd use "route" in that situation. – Dan Bron Oct 11 '14 at 22:39
  • sure, route as Dan says. – Fattie Oct 12 '14 at 15:12
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    Janos - it's simply unclear what you're asking. there are a number of different ways you can use "flight" with planes: almost certainly the "equivalent" words for bus are different words. – Fattie Oct 12 '14 at 15:13
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    @Joe is right. Are you talking about the flight you might take on flight UA3382 from Grand Rapids to Chicago? Or are you talking about the flight number? The two words happen to be the same for planes, but they are not for buses. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Oct 12 '14 at 15:19
  • The best answer I can suggest is the zero placeholder: Can I have a ticket for the 3:10 [] to Yuma. please? – Edwin Ashworth Oct 12 '14 at 18:54
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I agree with Drew's answer for American English: trip. Just as airlines tell their passengers to "enjoy your flight", the largest bus operator in America (Greyhound) tells its passengers to "enjoy your trip".

In the UK, the word journey can be used. The British D&G bus service tells its passengers to "Take a seat and enjoy your journey". But the word trip can also be used.

Having said that, you cannot use the words trip and journey for buses in all the same ways that you can use flight for planes. For example, you could say "My flight arrives at 8am", but you would never say "My trip/journey arrives at 8am". In that case you would just say "My bus arrives at 8am".

  • In my opinion, OP didn't ask the sense of flight in "enjoy your flight". You don't mean the technical sense of flight as a scheduled trip when you are saying "enjoy your flight". It is just a well-wish of your air travel. And I mentioned bus-flight equivalency in everyday speech before this answer. – ermanen Oct 12 '14 at 15:17
  • Nevertheless, trip is the corresponding noun for buses, cars, and similar modes of transportation. +1 – Robusto Oct 12 '14 at 15:40
  • But there is a difference between a general trip and a scheduled trip. Though, you can mean a scheduled trip by saying trip in the right context also. I addressed these in my answer. – ermanen Oct 12 '14 at 15:42
  • This is all moot. As has been pointed out now many times, quite simply, there are (utterly) different usages of "flight" and it's totally conceptually meaningless - indeed, time-wasting - to say "what's the equivalent of flight". You have to say "what's the equivalent of this sense of such-and-such word". You might as well ask "What is the french word for <insert any homograph here>". It's just silly, annoying, and time wasting. So there :) – Fattie Oct 13 '14 at 8:16
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I have heard route used in this manner. Sometimes, the announcement is "Route north, Seattle to Vancouver, now boarding at gate #12."

I answered this question as parallel to Flight Number. As a teenager, I had the privilege to fly Pan Am One, the famous route beginning in San Francisco, going westward around the world, and ending in San Francisco.

Trains also use route, as Amtrack's Coast Starlighter. [Amtrack][1] [1]: http://www.amtrak.com/coast-starlight-train

A flight is just one kind of trip, voyage, or journey. I don't know if English has some word specific to trips by bus, which is not applicable to other transport.

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    The route is the series of locations that the bus stops at. – dwjohnston Oct 11 '14 at 21:36
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All of these answers are wrong.

There are a number of different ways you can use "flight" with planes

Almost certainly, the "equivalent" various words for bus are different words.

English almost never maps usages across groups. Why would it?

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    While I agree, this constitutes a necessary comment. Unclear questions shouldn't be endorsed with 'answers': <<[You say] I asked for clarification from the OP. If those who answered the "original" question had done the same, instead of rushing to answer, I can't see there would have been [any problem]. Premature pre-emptive answers are no benefit to the site, so I [can’t] see any problem with them being downvoted if they don't answer the "final, clarified" question. If nothing else, this might discourage those hasty answerers from leaving what eventually amounts to "litter" on the site. FF>> – Edwin Ashworth Oct 12 '14 at 21:33
  • I agree totally – Fattie Oct 13 '14 at 8:09
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Trip. When you buy a bus ticket from A to B you buy a bus-trip ticket from A to B, that is, a ticket for the bus trip from A to B.

But you can just as well not use any word for the trip, if you are specifying A and B. Please give me a ticket from A to B is understood as asking for a ticket for the trip from A to B.

(And you might want to check out the site English Language Learners.)

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    'Journey' would probably be more usual in the UK; 'trip' often means 'excursion' and connotes accordingly otherwise. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 11 '14 at 19:47
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    @EdwinAshworth: You might want to enter journey as a separate answer. In AmE it is far more usual to take a bus trip than a bus journey. And (in AmE) you generally buy a ticket for the bus trip from A to B. Using journey here (in AmE) is akin to using voyage - it is certainly not what one would usually employ for a local excursion. (But of course, all are possible.) – Drew Oct 11 '14 at 19:52
  • Within the UK passenger transport industry itself, it's quite common to distinguish trip as being a specific instance of a scheduled journey on a particular date/time. In that context, journeys themselves are specific subcomponents (each with scheduled day-of-week + time of day) of routes (different ways the bus might travel from A to B, also known as services). – FumbleFingers Oct 11 '14 at 20:21
  • This isn't a good answer as it is Drew. Provide a definition and example usage. – dwjohnston Oct 11 '14 at 21:35
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Summary:

When you are buying tickets, you can simply say bus ticket. (bus ticket vs. flight/airline/airplane ticket).

Details:

Technically, the equivalent term for flight is bus service for the scheduled bus trip sense which differs from a general bus trip. It shouldn't be confused with service that means an organized system for the needs of the public. I'm not saying that this term is what you use during a conversation or when buying a ticket, it is the equivalent technical term.

service - [countable] a bus, train, ship, or plane that goes regularly to a particular place or at a particular time

http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/service#service_27


flight - an airplane scheduled to fly a certain route at a certain time

[Webster's New World College Dictionary]

In my opinion, bus trip/ride/journey/excursion is an equivalent of air/aircraft travel in general if there is no indication of a scheduled service. Though, these terms can be used within the right context and be equivalent to flight especially in the context of transport services. For example, there are trip planners or journey planners in the websites of these services.

Flight covers three meanings in this context:

  • a general trip/journey of an airplane

  • a scheduled trip of an airplane

  • an airplane making a scheduled trip.

As I mentioned earlier, the equivalent term for the scheduled trip sense is bus service. Though, the problem is that it is not very useful in everyday speech.

Most of the time, simply "bus" is used as an equivalent of flight in everyday speech. For example, you cannot say "My bus service is at 2pm". But you can say "My bus is at 2 pm".

  • No; the dictionary gets close but not close enough. The two words have different distributions. The flight leaves from gate 43 / the service you require stops at the bus station near the market, OK. But I booked a flight on the London shuttle / *I booked a service to London. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 12 '14 at 14:18
  • 'Which term should I use when I want to buy a ticket from A to B for a scheduled bus, similar to what flight means for planes?' 'I want a ticket for the 2:30 flight from LA to SF, please.' // 'I want a ticket for the 2:30 bus from LA to SF, please.' NOT 'bus service' (which is more general than a particular flight or train / ferry / bus ... journey). As Joe says below, a wrong answer. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 12 '14 at 18:42
  • Yes. Better than you read the question, it appears. 'You asked for an equivalent word for the scheduled trip sense' is not true; OP asked 'Which term should I use when I want to buy a ticket from A to B for a scheduled bus, similar to what flight means for planes?' I'd use 'I want a ticket for the 2:30 [bus, but this could be dropped at the ticket counter] [from LA (also unnecessary in the LA ticket office) to SF, please.' NOT 'bus service'. – Edwin Ashworth Oct 12 '14 at 18:50
  • Unclear questions shouldn't be endorsed with 'answers': <<[You say] I asked for clarification from the OP. If those who answered the "original" question had done the same, instead of rushing to answer, I can't see there would have been [any problem]. Premature pre-emptive answers are no benefit to the site, so I [can’t] see any problem with them being downvoted if they don't answer the "final, clarified" question. If nothing else, this might discourage those hasty answerers from leaving what eventually amounts to "litter" on the site. FF>> – Edwin Ashworth Oct 12 '14 at 18:57
  • I have never encountered the phrase flight ticket. But I've bought many airplane tickets. – pazzo Oct 12 '14 at 19:15

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