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The sentence:

Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60%; higher than Amumu's.

I am not sure if I should put a semi colon, period, or comma in between "60%" and "higher."

  • I'd use 'Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60% – higher than Amumu's.' or 'Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60%, which is [even] higher than Amumu's.' The semicolon seems to be the most revered of intrasentence stops, in that inventive usages are not often well received. – Edwin Ashworth Sep 30 '14 at 17:59
  • The important thing, it would seem to me, would be to remove any ambiguity. Does Rammus have a win rate of 60%? Or does he have a win rate that is 60% higher than that of Amumu? I sense that it is the former, which is why you need a heavy punctuation mark after 60%. I might go so far as to make it a full stop. – WS2 Sep 30 '14 at 20:03
  • Another approach: "At nearly 60%, Rammus's win rate is higher than Amumu's." – Sven Yargs Sep 30 '14 at 20:10
  • @SvenYargs: Uh, whose rate is "at nearly 60%"? What you say is correct, but can easily be misinterpreted by some readers. This suggestion by EA is clearer: "Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60%, which is higher than Amumu's". – Drew Sep 30 '14 at 23:07
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There are many correct ways. The following are arrange in order of my own personal preference:

Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60% --higher than Amumu's.

Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60%, higher than Amumu's.

Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60%; higher than Amumu's.

What you cannot use is a full stop since higher than Amumu's has no verb. Ideally, change the sentence a bit. Something like

Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60%, [much/slightly/significantly] higher than Amumu's.

  • I agree with the first suggestion, though It would be more properly written as an em dash — the use of two hyphens being a workaround for those who are unable to type the proper character (Unicode U+2014). – 200_success Oct 31 '14 at 7:35
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A comma is ok. You would put a semicolon in a case like the following:

Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60%; Amumu has a win rate of about 50%.

A period can be used with more complex sentences like the following:

Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60%. The above win rate is barely sufficient to beat that of Amumu, which is around 59%.

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I would go with the semicolon, because there are effectively two sentences there:

Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60%. [This is] higher than Amumu's.

However, the meaning is not lost with a comma.

On the other hand,

Rammus has a win rate of nearly 60% higher than Amumu's.

(No punctuation) compares Rammus' rate with Amumu's.

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