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“It doesn’t have to be a huge event to make a difference, Jones said. “Any kind of activity-related event that can include a fundraising component can be directed toward charity.”

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You need quotation marks after the comma following 'difference' in the above.

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Your example uses double quotation marks (the usual style in U.S. English) and puts the close double quotation mark for the second quoted sentence outside the period. Following U.S. style elsewhere in your example, you would add a close double quotation mark after the comma to signify the end of the first quoted sentence:

“It doesn’t have to be a huge event to make a difference," Jones said. “Any kind of activity-related event that can include a fundraising component can be directed toward charity.”

British English style favors single quotation marks in the situation you describe, and has a more variable approach to where the internal close quotation mark should go relative to the other punctuation marks. Here is what the Oxford Style Manual (2003) has to say about punctuation positioning in such cases (at 5.13.3):

The placement of a comma should reflect the original speech. Three quoted extracts—with and without internal punctuation—might be:

Go home to your father.

Go home, and never come back.

Yes, we will. It's a good idea.

These may be presented:

'Go home', he said, 'to your father.'

'Go home,' he said, 'and never come back.'

'Yes,' he said, 'we will. It's a good idea.'

As these examples show, the Oxford style is to put the close quotation mark outside punctuation that occurs in the unquoted sentence, but inside punctuation that is added to the unquoted sentence (such as the comma in the first example).

Following these guidelines, we would handle your example quotation this way:

'It doesn’t have to be a huge event to make a difference,' Jones said. 'Any kind of activity-related event that can include a fundraising component can be directed toward charity.'

In contrast, the normal U.S. style ignores the question of whether a punctuation mark was or wasn't in the original unquoted sentence. So the three examples that appear in the Oxford Style Manual would be handled as follows under normal U.S. style:

"Go home," he said, "to your father."

"Go home," he said, "and never come back."

"Yes," he said, "we will. It's a good idea."

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