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Then, when we rid ourselves of prejudice, or racial feeling, and look facts in the face, we must acknowledge that, notwithstanding the cruelty and moral wrong of slavery, the ten million Negroes inhabiting this country, who themselves or whose ancestors went through the school of American slavery, are in a stronger and more hopeful condition, materially, intellectually, morally, and religiously, than is true of an equal number of black people in any other portion of the globe.

—— from Up from Slavery of Booker T. Washington.

A newspaper clipping, showing the bottom of an image with the caption "Mr. Washington at the Reffner Home, Malden in 1899". Below the image are two columns of text. The text starts and ends mid-word "ing the cruelty and moral wrong of slavery, the ten million negroes inhabiting this country, who themselves or whose ancestors went through the school of American slavery, are in a stronger and more hopeful condition, materially, intellectually, morally, and religiously, than is true of an equal number of black people in any other portion of the globe. This is so to such an extent that negroes in this country, who themselves or whose forefathers went through the school of slavery, are constantly returning to Africa ask me in these days how, in the midst of what sometimes seem hopelessly discouraging conditions, I can have such faith in the culture of my race in this country, I remind them of the wilderness through which, and out of which, a good Providence has already led us.¶ Ever since I have been old enough to think for myself, I have entertained the idea that, notwithstanding the cruel wrongs inflicted upon us, the black man got nearly as much out of slavery as the white man did. The hurtful influences of the insti-"

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If you take away the adjectives you have "... Negroes [in he USA] are in a stronger and more hopeful condition than is true of ... black people [elsewhere]."

With this we can see that it is meaningless in context - the author's point (such as it is among the rambling) would be just as well served if it were omitted.

The book obviously dates from the time when high verbosity was considered to demonstrate high intelligence. This is cultural, modern culture tends to prize conciseness.

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