8

I'd like to say something like:

I helped my company win a $1m deal with customer A.

I'm not sure which one of the following is the best one for a formal document? e.g. in a resume:

1 million dollar deal, $1 million deal, 1 million$ deal, or anything better?

6
  • Why not use simply a million dollar deal? Not sure you need the 1 when you have a. Sep 22, 2014 at 9:06
  • it's WIN, not WON. Also you should be more precise, like "I won a $1.3m deal for the company."
    – Fattie
    Sep 22, 2014 at 12:14
  • 1
    @JoeBlow, I like the way you say "it's WIN" and then your example uses WON - lol.
    – Ben
    Sep 22, 2014 at 13:30
  • LOL exactly !!!
    – Fattie
    Sep 22, 2014 at 14:59
  • But serious Dej, it's "I helped win" or "I won"
    – Fattie
    Sep 22, 2014 at 15:00

3 Answers 3

8

Officially, m stands for milli (which means 10-3, i.e. a thousandth), and M stands for mega, that is million.
A $5k or a $2M deal would be better.

More formal would be

a five thousand dollar deal or a $5,000 deal
a two million dollar deal or a $2,000,000 deal.

I would certainly refrain from mixing text and numbers, especially in formal writing, so I would avoid anything using

*$2 million, *$5 thousand

15
  • What about a one million dollar deal? Is it ok to put a and one together?
    – Deqing
    Sep 22, 2014 at 9:50
  • I see no problem with a one (million) dollar deal, as it explicitly shows the deal is worth on million, not two or three. Just a million dollar deal means roughly the same, but it feels less precise.
    – oerkelens
    Sep 22, 2014 at 10:50
  • @oerkelens Why not two or three? A in this case has a special meaning, not one per se. There is a recent related Q on ELU. I've not yet checked it again.
    – Kris
    Sep 22, 2014 at 11:11
  • @Kris: are you asking why one does not mean two? I am making exactly the point you seem to be expressing: a million dollar deal may not be about exactly one million!
    – oerkelens
    Sep 22, 2014 at 11:25
  • 1
    the fact is though, it's extremely common to use "m" (not "M") when you're discussing such stuff. we did 3m this year, that was a 2m deal, etc.
    – Fattie
    Sep 22, 2014 at 12:16
3

1 million dollar deal — Use words instead: (a) one million dollar deal
$1 million deal — correct, but unidiomatic
1 million$ deal — just plain wrong, currency symbol is not suffixed to words.
$1m deal — correct, but unidiomatic

The options would thus be:

  • One million dollar deal — should be okay
  • A million dollar deal — idiomatic, preferred in literary/ narrative use
  • A $1m deal — use in shortened versions, titles, captions, abstracts …
  • A one million dollar deal — uses the idiom, use for effect.
2
  • 1
    Note that "a million dollar deal" need not have anything to do with one million or even with dollars.
    – Kris
    Sep 22, 2014 at 11:13
  • A one-million-dollar deal, with a dash.
    – Lambie
    Jul 6, 2020 at 20:31
-3

I guess the corrections may be the following:
category-1
"I helped my company winning a million dollars' deal with customer A."
"I helped my company winning a one million dollars' deal with customer A."
category-2
"I helped my company winning a US$1 million (1M) deal with customer A."
"I helped my company winning a $1 million (1m) deal with customer A."
category-3
"I helped my company winning a US$1 million deal with customer A."
"I helped my company winning a $1 million deal with customer A."
category-4
"I helped my company winning a US$1M deal with customer A."
"I helped my company winning a US$1m deal with customer A."
category-5
"I helped my company winning a $1M deal with customer A."
"I helped my company winning a $1m deal with customer A."

All, stated above, are correct; I, on the whole, prefer to use category-2/sentence no-1 .

REFERENCES:
1)https://www.onlinegrammar.com.au/writing-style-tips-how-to-write-about-money/
2)https://www.avidcareerist.com/2014/01/06/how-to-abbreviate-million-on-your-resume/
3)https://www.thebalance.com/write-numbers-using-words-4083198

1
  • 1
    Welcome to Stack Exchange! Most of the sentences you've written sound quite foreign to me. Jul 7, 2020 at 13:48

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