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I heard this phrase when I was watching Battleship. An old man said,

"Somebody is gonna kiss the donkey."

I do not know what it means, I only heard it in a movie. What is this phrase mean?

In Addition:

I think it was Rihanna who said "Saddle Ridge will be in weapons range in five minutes," then the old man stated the phrase.

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    I haven't seen the film. Another word for Donkey is Ass though. So maybe the claim here that it means "someone will kiss their ass goodbye" could be credible? Does that make sense in context? – Martin Smith Sep 21 '14 at 13:29
  • Not an expression I’ve ever heard. Could you edit your question to give some more context, please? Like, what’s going on when the old man says it? – Janus Bahs Jacquet Sep 21 '14 at 13:47
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    It's not a standard idiom, but I think @Martin has nailed the allusion. It's sci-fi, in which context scriptwriters often throw in credible, easily-understood "made-up slang of the future". I just found the exact context in a subtitle file (at 1h:43m:36s) CORA: "Saddle Ridge will be in weapons range in five minutes!". OLD MAN: "Oh, brother, somebody is going to kiss the donkey!". Which strongly suggests death and destruction is imminent. – FumbleFingers Sep 21 '14 at 14:11
  • @FumbleFingers you also included the timeline :-) – rpm07 Sep 21 '14 at 14:17
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    @FumbleFingers I have nothing to say. However, I do appreciate your honesty and your answer for my question. :-) – rpm07 Sep 21 '14 at 14:54
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It is a confused attempt at a play on (for example) "kiss my ass," or, some similar phrase.

It is quite common in English today that idioms get mangled.

  • Battleship is rated PG-13. The word "ass" (referring to one's backside) occurs elsewhere in the film. – pazzo Sep 22 '14 at 15:46
  • @CarSmack - worthy information. – Fattie Sep 22 '14 at 17:51
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This is a Wiki post which means anyone can freely edit, improve or add any relevant information. No one will gain any reputation points.

In the film Battleship, the catchphrase Oh brother, somebody gonna kiss the donkey is uttered by the character JPJ Sailor. The website Aloha On My Mind claims it is Hawaiian slang or Pidgin but doesn't provide a translation.

I did, however, find the word donkey listed on the Hawaiian website Write Pidgin in its introduction it says

Diffren peopo write dea Pidgin language diffren way. Dis how us guys write um fo Da Jesus Book. If you like write um some odda way, az okay, no bodda us guys. Gotta chop up da alphabets so da Internet can bring um to you mo quick. Click da one you like check.

Under the letter -D, donkey is listed and an example of how the word is used is the following

mill stone: two big stones fo make wheat flour. Da small kine, two wahines can turn da top one togedda. Da big kine, need one donkey fo turn um

So, unsurprisingly, donkey in Hawaiian means donkey in English. Which leaves me with two plausible explanations for the catchphrase.

First, in the UK an ass is just another name for donkey. The American slang kiss my ass! (BrEng arse) to a Brit would literally mean "kiss my donkey"; therefore, somebody is gonna kiss the donkey means that person's request or wish is going to be rejected aggressively. Not having seen the film, I suspect the to-be-kissed-buttucks belong to JPJ Sailor's, in other words, he is flatly refusing to surrender or concede to the "enemy's" demands.

Secondly, but least likely explanation, an ass is another word for a fool, an idiot, a stupid person etc. Hence the phrase "gonna kiss the donkey" could mean that somebody will have to kiss the foolish/idiot/imbecile person very soon.

  • it seemed like a good idea at the time :) I remember there being quite a fuss. Although the post has attracted over 4,000 views ... so somebody wants to know what it means. – Mari-Lou A May 1 '15 at 5:53
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Also notice, it's an asian guy saying the line. "Kissing the donkey" probably just means they've made an ass of themselves & are about to own that mistake.

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    In what way does "Asian" change the speaker's meaning? Does it mean he doesn't know English well, or that he is trying to save face? – Theresa Oct 12 '14 at 0:04

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