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Suppose we have job A, B and C. Job A requires more skill than job B and C. How do we say that?

i) The job that requires most skill is job A.

ii) The job that most requires skill is job A.

iii) The job that requires skill the most is job A.

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  • 1
    They're all valid. You missed out two more (you can include the in #1, and delete it in #3). But note that if you include the in #2 it would be archaic/ungrammatical to almost everyone by today's standards. See also Which is more common - 'the most' or 'most'? Sep 18, 2014 at 13:00
  • 2
    This question ought to be asked on English Language Learners
    – Kris
    Sep 18, 2014 at 15:20
  • Someone thought this question was POB?!
    – Kris
    Sep 18, 2014 at 15:20

3 Answers 3

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i) is the closest, although I would add an extra word: The job that requires the most skill is job A.

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I would personally use "the most" in i).

i) sounds like you are answering a question about which jobs presented require the most skill. The focus here is on "skill"--the most skill.

ii) places an emphasis on "most" due to word placement. So, when you would say this out loud, you would actually hear the emphasis on that word. The focus here is actually on "requires"--so, we're talking about the job that requires it the most, not necessarily requires the most skill. (Does that make sense?)

iii) is the same as ii), just worded differently. "The most" is referring to "requires skill."

0

Option i) seems right to some extent. It is better to use "the most skills" instead of 'most skill'.

Secondly why don't you make it easy like: Job A requires more Skills. Or from your own written text: "Job A requires more skills than job B and C".

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    The OP never uses the plural word "skills", and we have to assume that that was a deliberate choice. The plural word "skills", obviously, refers to a multiplicity of distinct skills; such as creativity and vocabulary, or perhaps hand-eye coordination and strength. The question is about three jobs that require (as far as can be determined from the question) one skill, to varying degrees. Sep 18, 2014 at 16:57

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