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I am thanking someone in type by saying :

"John and Mary for being there even when you aren't near."

Would it be better or worse to use 'here' :

"John and Mary for being here even when you aren't near."

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    You probably want to say "Thanks to John and Mary for being there for me, even when they aren't near", though "being there" would serve as a perfectly fine abbreviation of that phrase, and "being here" a amusing and comprehensible pun.
    – Dan Bron
    Commented Sep 17, 2014 at 19:32

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In context of the statement, it appears that you wish to express gratitude for their presence. (evident from : aren't near)

"John and Mary for their (reassuring) presence even when you aren't near."

A look at these examples:

■I want you to come here to see me.

■I am already here so let me see if they have to stuff I need.

■I called my friend to tell her that I am here.

Here-has been used when something or someone is close.

"John and Mary for being here even when you aren't near."

Another example, here vs there:

David: Is there an apple on that table over there?

Frank: Yes, there is. Here it is.

David: Great, are there any oranges?

Frank: No, there aren't.

David: Oh, here they are, next to me on this table.

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