1

Example:

Pedro was standing on my left, his hair [...], watching the rocks being beaten endlessly by the waves.

I'm curious, is there a word that means being blown by the wind?

  • 1
    it's "windblown". or, "windswept". – Fattie Sep 17 '14 at 4:26
5

Sounds like you're looking for a verb, but there is an adjective windblown that may also be useful.

The trees were tattered and windblown.

For a verb, you could also use buffet:

Our tents were buffeted by the strong winds blowing down from the mountain.

But buffet can also be used for water and perhaps other things that cause things to shake, rattle, or roll.

4

Yes, and that word, believe it or else, is blowing.

Pedro was standing on my left, his hair blowing madly in the wind, watching the rocks being beaten endlessly by the waves.

Yes, I know it is the wind that is blowing the hair, but we also say that a person’s hair blows in the wind.

You may think of this as a type of middle voice construction if that helps, like when we say that the records are selling well. Someone else is selling the records, but we say the records are selling. So when the wind is blowing your hair, we can likewise say that your hair is blowing. It’s active in form but passive in meaning.

2

If you want to be fancy, you can always use waving or fluttering or other synonyms to that.

Pedro was standing on my left, his hair fluttering in the wind, watching the rocks being beaten endlessly by the waves.

2

I'm not entirely sure that a single verb is necessarily the best word. It might be, but consider others as well.

Pedro was standing on my left, his hair wind-tossed, watching the rocks being beaten endlessly by the waves.

Pedro was standing on my left, his hair a flurry, watching the rocks being beaten endlessly by the waves.

Pedro was standing on my left, his hair blustered, watching the rocks being beaten endlessly by the waves.

Pedro was standing on my left, his hair like grass in a storm, watching the rocks being beaten endlessly by the waves.

There you get two adjectives, a noun, and a simile construction.

I would suggest buffeting, but it carries connotation of vibrational movement, possibly damaging. Windblown, as @tchrist suggested, is a good one.

  • "Windblown" was actually suggested by @adj7388, tchrist only edited the post. – Mari-Lou A Sep 17 '14 at 5:36
2

Cloth, or anything else that is both flexible and loose at one end (e.g. plastic sheeting) might be said to be flapping or fluttering in the wind, or possibly wind-whipped.

I would use flapping or wind-whipped for large movements occurring at moderately long intervals, and fluttering for the kind of small, rapid movements that might be produced by the action of a stiff but steady breeze.

0

"his hair tousled by the wind..."

to make (someone's hair) untidy

"Tousle." Merriam-Webster.com. Merriam-Webster, n.d. Web. 27 Apr. 2016.

protected by tchrist Feb 11 at 12:21

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