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I.E.

Which of these is correct?

A. You are cool, funny, and among the most popular of students at this school.

B. You are cool, funny, and are among the most popular of students at this school.

If neither is correct, how would I say what I am trying to say?

  • None are technically correct. Why do you think one of them must be? Ignoring the commas, there are two "mistakes" in your examples. – Mari-Lou A Sep 12 '14 at 20:56
  • @Mari-LouA: I can't stand it! Tell me! What are the mistakes? – Mitch Sep 12 '14 at 21:21
  • @Mitch "Mistakes" because they're not exactly ungrammatical but... " You are cool, funny, and among the most popular (of) students in this school." – Mari-Lou A Sep 12 '14 at 21:29
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    There's ungrammatical and there's informal. I don't find any of these ungrammatical (speaker of AmE); people speak and write them all the time without noticing. They may not be standard or newspaper-proper; I think they're fine, but I'm not a newspaper editor. – Mitch Sep 13 '14 at 18:35
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    @Mitch I agree about the points Mari-Lou mentioned (both are perfectly grammatical and to me no less informal than her suggested versions), but repeating the verb is at least borderline ungrammatical to me. If you repeat the verb, you'll have to repeat (an anaphor of) the subject as well, making it a separate clause (and adding in an extra and in the now reduced list): “You are cool and funny, and you are among the most popular students at this school”. – Janus Bahs Jacquet Oct 12 '14 at 22:42
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A is fine. B is not, since it does not satisfy the pattern of conjunction reduction. To get B, with 3 things coordinated, we'd have to start with:

*"You are cool, you are funny, and you are are among the most popular of students at this school."

so that each conjunct starts in the same syntactic environment, that is: [you are ___].

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A is better. There is no need to repeat the verb with "are among" as it is already implied.

You are cool, [are] funny and [are] among the most popular of students at this school.

One thing though - remove the comma after "funny" - that shouldn't be there:

You are cool, funny and among the most popular of students at this school.
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    The "Oxford comma" after "funny" is correct, as is omitting it. Both are acceptable ways of writing a list. – GentlePurpleRain Sep 12 '14 at 21:55

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