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I'm trying to figure out how best to word the above sentence. It's for a web page, and at the bottom of the page there will be a search bar. To me "you are" or "you're" is the best fit, because the idea is you've scrolled through the page, and not found what you're after, so you're still looking.

Which of those (if any?) would be the correct way to phrase this question?

Also, I'm not sure how to tag this question, so any edits welcome.

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The correct sentence would be:

Didn't find what you were looking for?

Why? Because you did not find something. That happens when you were looking for something, in the past. So, when you did not find something, you can't use a construction which indicates you are still looking (in present tense), ie: you are looking.

To address your other question:

To me "you are" or "you're" is the best fit, because the idea is you've scrolled through the page, and not found what you're after, so you're still looking.

True, that you have scrolled through the page and did not find what you were looking for, so you're still searching. To address this, you need to use the present form of "didn't" ie: "can't", and the correct question would be:

Can't find what you are/you're looking for?

OR

Still can't find what you're looking for?

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  • Ahh, thanks for clearing that up :). I think out of all of those, I prefer "Can't find what you're looking for?" best. – TMH Sep 2 '14 at 11:47
  • What do you think of U2's song "I still haven't found what I'm looking for"? – Em1 Sep 2 '14 at 12:09

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