3

Say that I have a Pokémon with 2 types: Fire and Flying. One could say this Pokémon has "multiple types." That is because the designer of this Pokémon "typed" it that way.

Is it correct to say the Pokémon was "multiply typed," where "multiply" is an adverb describing how it was typed? Is there a better and succinct way of describing this typing process?

5
  • That (multiply typed) seems fine to me.
    – GEdgar
    Sep 1 '14 at 16:49
  • Here are a few written references to things which are multiply specified. OP's use of typed is probably more "unusual" than multiply, but they're just uncommon forms, not "errors". Sep 1 '14 at 17:16
  • @FumbleFingers, if you accumulate your comments into an answer I will accept it.
    – Jackson
    Sep 1 '14 at 17:21
  • @Jackson: Despite the fact that some people (including at least you and Mynamite) aren't familiar with adverbial/adjectival multiply, I think the question is General Reference (both myself and Lunivore had no problem finding the relevant dictionary definitions). Sep 1 '14 at 17:24
  • @Jackson: Or maybe just more prepared to extrapolate from "normal, acceptable" usages to "less common, but still acceptable" ones. I doubt you'd have a problem with reading about a multiply connected [thing which has multiple connections]. So I reckon part of the problem is just that the slightly unusual usage typed had already put you "out of your linguistic comfort zone". Sep 1 '14 at 17:39
2

In most cases, you could use the word multi-typed. However, I imagine this might cause confusion in Pokemon, since multitype is itself a specific Pokemon ability. If this describes exactly what you're looking for then fantastic, but note that it comes with a set of rules that may not help to explain the multiple types outside of those rules.

Multiply typed is therefore fine. Note that the pronunciation of multiply in this instance is /-plē/ to rhyme with ripply, rather than /plī/ to rhyme with fly.

8
  • Multiply as an adverb doesn't seem to exist in the quick online search I've done.
    – Mynamite
    Sep 1 '14 at 17:04
  • @Mynamite It's right there in the top result for me (you need to click the "down" arrow to extend the result): google.co.uk/webhp?q=define%3A%20multiply
    – Lunivore
    Sep 1 '14 at 17:09
  • @Mynamite: I just Googled define multiply adverb. The first two references (Merriam-Webster and dictgionary.com) both have it. In MW it's defined as adverb - in a multiple manner : in several ways <multiply talented children> (similar in dictionary.com). Sep 1 '14 at 17:11
  • @FumbleFingers Hands up, I give in. Maybe it's a US thing? I don't think I've heard it used.
    – Mynamite
    Sep 1 '14 at 17:14
  • 1
    @Lunivore Using standard notation (and citing the OED here), the adverb is pronounced /ˈmʌltɪplɪ/, while the verb is pronounced /ˈmʌltɪplaɪ/ with an unreduced diphthong at the end. Some dictionaries indicate a non-reduced syllable that lacks primary stress by placing a secondary-stress mark in front of that syllable.
    – tchrist
    Sep 1 '14 at 17:27
0

Since a Pokemon is an (imaginary) creature with a personality, I would call this one dual-natured. Having "multiple types" is a more mathematical characteristic.

If you are discussing the Pokemon in a technical context, multiply-typed is just fine.

-1

You would do better to shorten it to multi-typed.

Your phrase could cause confusion in two ways. Multiply as a verb is pronounced to rhyme with lie (sorry, I don't know IPA). So the first reading is not with a short y sound eg rhyming with hilly.

Typed is also problematic because of confusion with keyboard typing, whereas as you mean given, or accorded a type.

Addition: Given Lunivore's comment about Pokemon multitypes, how about multi-granted?

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  • There's even more confusion than that if you use multi-typed with Pokemon, though: pokemondb.net/ability/multitype
    – Lunivore
    Sep 1 '14 at 16:55
  • @Lunivore Thanks, I'm not familiar with Pokemon types.
    – Mynamite
    Sep 1 '14 at 17:00
  • Me neither; I spotted it while searching for multityped to see if it could be used as one word, moments before you posted your answer.
    – Lunivore
    Sep 1 '14 at 17:03
  • Also the word lie in mathematics can be pronounced to rhyme with hilly too... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lie_group
    – Lunivore
    Sep 1 '14 at 17:08
  • 1
    The English language is too much for me, I'm going to go live in a cave. Pronounced cavvy.
    – Mynamite
    Sep 1 '14 at 17:12

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