3

Misdirection is used for distracting attention of an audience.

In a similar sense, audio visual artists (TV, movies, etc.) spice up historical epics.

They introduce unproven/undocumented events and figures just for the sake increasing viewership.

What would be an appropriate word for it? Would misdepiction be suitable?

5
  • Use "misdepiction" if that is meant. The "word" has already been used.
    – Kris
    Sep 1 '14 at 5:13
  • The phrase "spice up historical epics to belittle them to the point of titillation" does not make much sense to me. Do you mean something like "'spice up' historical epics, in attempt to make them titillating, but thereby losing what makes them great"?
    – ruakh
    Sep 1 '14 at 5:34
  • @ruakh - That's not exactly what I meant. What I really meant was introduction of unproven/undocumented events and figures just for the sake increasing viewership Sep 1 '14 at 6:45
  • Hi Singla! to be clear do you mean "USING SPECIAL EFFECTS" (to "make things look dramatic") or do you mean when the movie "ADDS WHOLE THINGS" that simply didn't happen (they add a battle that never happened, add a general who never existed, and so on).
    – Fattie
    Sep 1 '14 at 7:01
  • @JoeBlow - I mean when the movie "ADDS WHOLE THINGS" that simply didn't happen or still worse exaggerate it, like in case of 300 (movie). Sep 1 '14 at 11:07
1

You could try hype (Dicionary.com, definitions 3 through 7):

(verb)
3) to intensify (advertising, promotion, or publicity) by ingenious or questionable claims, methods, etc. (usually followed by up);
4) to trick; gull.
(noun)
5) exaggerated publicity; hoopla.
6) an ingenious or questionable claim, method, etc., used in advertising, promotion, or publicity to intensify the effect.
7) a swindle, deception, or trick.

1
  • a nice idea ...
    – Fattie
    Sep 1 '14 at 7:53
6

The most common term for that would likely be misrepresentation.

2
  • There's a difference, maybe subtle, in the meaning.
    – Kris
    Sep 1 '14 at 5:13
  • doesn't seem subtle at all to me, they're different! (But yes, I guess that's exactly the word OP is looking for.)
    – Fattie
    Sep 1 '14 at 6:58
2

As pointed out, misrepresentation is the most direct equivalent of misdirection. Both words are neutral and abstract.

On the other hand, to take historical material in the way the question describes and make a more exciting but less accurate story is to mythologize.

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