0

I am wondering whether it is possible to use an adverbial phrase with 'where' to describe words like 'ashore' or 'aground'.

Examples:

  1. I stepped ashore where the sun was filling with a red gleam the water, excited through a gentle breeze.
  2. The ship ran aground where lighthouse's beam didn't reveal the dangerous reef.
  • 3
    In the first, there should be a comma (and an intonation dip) after ashore. In the second, it should be ran aground, and the lighthouse's beam. It's perfectly permissible to use where for any locative expression, and also metaphorically with many other things. – John Lawler Aug 30 '14 at 16:53
  • Ok, thanks for the hints. Maybe I should check what I've wrote next time. But I wonder, (?) why to set a comma before 'where'. My teacher told me never to set one before conjunctions. – Albjenow Aug 31 '14 at 12:07
  • 1
    Unfortunately, your teacher appears to have been taught improperly. That's not the way commas work. There are no punctuation rules that refer to individual words. Full stops come at the end of full independent clauses; but commas are use to represent an intonation contour of a particular sort, and when native speakers hear it, they write it (if they're literate, of course). – John Lawler Aug 31 '14 at 15:07
1

In the first, there should be a comma (and an intonation dip) after ashore. In the second, it should be ran aground, and the lighthouse's beam. It's perfectly permissible to use where for any locative expression, and also metaphorically with many other things. – John Lawler

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.