1

I'm trying to improve on the last part of this sentence:

Mirabeau pointed out that the text was not his, although he did not provide the names of its authors, either.

My first instinct is:

Mirabeau pointed out that the text was not his, although he neither provided the names of its authors.

But something feels wrong here, and I can't explain why.

Any ideas?

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    Mirabeau pointed out that the text was not his, though he did not provide the names of its authors.? – TJ- Aug 30 '14 at 7:16
  • Leave out neither or though; use but or and or semicolon: “Mirabeau noted the text was not his, but did not give the names of its authors” or “Mirabeau said the text was not his, and didn't give its authors' names”. – James Waldby - jwpat7 Aug 30 '14 at 14:58
  • The suggested duplicate only addresses 'neither' when used with 'nor'. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 31 '14 at 17:44
3

You really need to introduce a preposition or conjunction or two to make it work. 'Although' seems to me to be the word that is cramping things, as it does some of the work of 'neither' too.

Possibilities:

Whilst Mirabeau pointed out that the text was not his, neither did he provide the names of its authors.

Mirabeau pointed out that the text was not his, but neither did he provide the names of its authors.

  • Why is "but" needed in your second alternative? It sounds a lot more natural without it. – Irene Aug 30 '14 at 8:54
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    I think part of what feels wrong about it, to me, is that "neither" doesn't follow a negative verb. Isn't that the general rule? "Mirabeau never denied that the text was not his, but neither did he provide the names of its authors." ... That changes the meaning a bit of "pointed out", but it provides an example. – Matt Aug 30 '14 at 8:58
  • You have the correct answer, @Matt. From Google dictionary [bolding mine]: used to introduce a further negative statement. "he didn't remember, and neither did I". Post this as an answer. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 30 '14 at 9:45
  • @Irene On reflection I think 'and' would have been better. – WS2 Aug 30 '14 at 13:34
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Using 'neither' after a non-negative-verb main clause (Mirabeau pointed out ...) does not work.

*John said he didn't like tomatoes, though he neither went to buy any.

A valid sentence is:

John didn't say he liked tomatoes, and neither did he buy any.

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"although he did not provide the names of its authors, either(*)" is correct because the use of "neither" in the middle of the sentence is not connected to the logical expression to justify an exclusion.

(*) But to make it better we'd rather strike the fnal word "either" which is useless and heavy. Then we'd have : "Mirabeau pointed out (that) the text was not his, although he did not provide the names of its authors". We do not need here this "either".

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