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What would be an expression for:
Someone who wants expensive stuff; someone who wants luxuries, and who lacks in appreciation.

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flashy

see flashiness

excessive or unnecessary display
his penchant for flashiness, as evidenced by his expensive, specially tailored suits

May be even vain

see vanity

Excessive pride in or admiration of one’s own appearance or achievements

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Consider social climber

A person who is eager to gain a higher social status. Also called climber. [Oxford Dictionaries Online]

Related terms are arriviste, nouveau-riche, parvenu, upstart which generally mean

a person who has suddenly risen to a higher economic status but has not gained social acceptance of others in that class [The Free Dictionary.com]

If the concept is of one who feigns sophistication or status, the term poser (or poseur) might apply

A person who acts in an affected manner in order to impress others. [Oxford Dictionaries Online]

  • Please note that the OP had mixed up the titles between this post and another. Now edited. – Kris Aug 31 '14 at 5:35
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I think you are referring to a social climber:

  • One who strives for acceptance in fashionable society.

Also a material person can convey the idea:

  • Of or concerned with the physical as distinct from the intellectual or spiritual: "Great men are they who see that spiritual is stronger than any material force, that thoughts rule the world" (Ralph Waldo Emerson).

Source : www.thefreedictionary.com

  • Please note that the OP had mixed up the titles between this post and another. Now edited. – Kris Aug 31 '14 at 5:33
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I would say such a person was Spoiled, as in spoiled child. Other good words:

Grandiose, Narcissistic or Egocentric-regressed.

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This may be a controversial choice, but I might use affluenzal in this situation. This would be the adjective form of the relatively new term for pathological materialism, affluenza.

This term officially denotes a real disorder, but its practical connotation often seems to be 'the condition of being spoiled as hell.'

Since influenzal is the adjective form of influenza (one of affluenza's etymological parents), affluenzal would logically follow as the adjective form of affluenza.

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