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Is it correct to say "What do you (more than 1 person) have in minds?" or we should say "What do you have in mind?". If both of the sentences are correct, which one is more idiomatic?

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    You say, to a group "What do you [guys, fellas, all, people,...] have in mind?" (singular). You could also say "What's on your minds?" (plural). The distinction is the former speaks of containment, and the latter of placement. But be warned: the two idioms have very different connotations (the second means, essentially, "What's bothering you [guys]?"). Anyway, that's why you cannot say "What do you have in minds?" (in + plural); it breaks the metaphor of containment. – Dan Bron Aug 27 '14 at 12:46
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    @DanBron Thanks, especially because you mentioned something new to me, I mean "containment" and "placement, which I can read about more. – mok Aug 27 '14 at 12:51
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    Mok: no problem! But note that the word "on" is about placement, not replacement (no re-); the soup is in the bowl, but the bowl is on the table. The bowl is placed on the table (placement). – Dan Bron Aug 27 '14 at 12:55
  • Though I appreciate mplungjan's answer, Dan Bron's answer sounds great to me, and I think it would help more people if you could post it as an answer. – mok Aug 27 '14 at 13:00
  • Alright, let me format it a bit then. – Dan Bron Aug 27 '14 at 13:08
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You say, to a group

What do you [guys, fellas, all, people,...] have in mind? (singular)

It is possible to use use the plural; for example, you could also say

What's on your minds?" (plural)

The distinction is the former, using in, speaks of containment, and the latter, using on, of placement.

But be warned: the two idioms have very different connotations. The second means, essentially, "What's bothering you [guys]?".

Anyway, that's why you cannot say "What do you have in minds?" (in + plural); it breaks the metaphor of containment.

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What do you have in mind

is the idiomatic version of what would you (one person or multiple) like to do

You might ask one person

What is on your mind

or more than one

What is on your minds

which is mostly used to inquire if there is a problem

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    Please add a note about the different connotations of these two constructions (otherwise, we're just setting up a trap for OP). – Dan Bron Aug 27 '14 at 12:50

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