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I'm analyzing this sentence and scanning it for prepositional, appositive and verbal phrases. In the sentence so far as I can tell there is only one prepositional and no appositive and no verbals (infinitive, gerund, participial). However, a few things do confuse me.

He is immortal, not because he alone among creatures has an inexhaustible voice but because he has a soul, a spirit capable of compassion and sacrifice and endurance.

From what I can tell, the 'among creatures' is a prepositional phrase with 'among' being the preposition. No appositives, but I feel like a sentence like this with such an interesting structure should have more than just a single prepositional phrase.

Am I missing something here? What other phrases exist here?

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    Soul and spirit are in apposition. Capable of compassion ... is a verbal phrase. Of compassion and ... is a prepositional phrase modifying capable. BTW, that's an odd bunch of things to be looking for. Your teacher must be a bit unusual. – John Lawler Aug 25 '14 at 3:31
  • What about all the noun phrases and determiner phrases? ;) This question is basically unanswerable unless you're more specific about which syntactic theory you use or which exact phrases you're looking for. If you don't think there are any verbal phrases then what are the phrases with is and has at their roots? – curiousdannii Aug 25 '14 at 6:41
  • @JohnLawler Isn't capable of compassion an adjective phrase? (I know it's a reduced relative clause here ...). Or does verbal phrase mean something else? Sorry if that's a dumb question ... – Araucaria - Not here any more. Aug 25 '14 at 23:49
  • Because ... endurance would be a prepositional phrase according to some writers like Huddleston & Pullum (CaGEL, 2002), with because being the preposition, but it's a bit of a contentious analysis ... – Araucaria - Not here any more. Aug 25 '14 at 23:52
  • @Araucaria: capable of compassion is a predicate adjective, and therefore the head of a verb phrase. As a predicate adjective, it requires an auxiliary be, which has been deleted here by Whiz-Deletion, producing the reduced VP. It works just the same as looking for compression or a man for all seasons; they can all be produced by reducing a relative clause. It might be that "verbal phrase" means something different to some people from Verb Phrase, but further deponent sayeth not. This is what I mean by "Verb Phrase". – John Lawler Aug 26 '14 at 1:54
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As John Lawler states in the comments:

Soul and spirit are in apposition. Capable of compassion ... is a verbal phrase. Of compassion and ... is a prepositional phrase modifying capable.

capable of compassion is a predicate adjective, and therefore the head of a verb phrase. As a predicate adjective, it requires an auxiliary be, which has been deleted here by Whiz-Deletion, producing the reduced VP. It works just the same as looking for compression or a man for all seasons; they can all be produced by reducing a relative clause. It might be that "verbal phrase" means something different to some people from Verb Phrase, but further deponent sayeth not. This is what I mean by "Verb Phrase". - John Lawler

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