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I have two variants of one sentence and I want to find out which of them is correct and why:

  1. So you'll see immediately the notification when the crucial for you information changes.

  2. So you’ll immediately see the notification when information crucial for you changes.

Main concern is position of "immediately".

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    Either position is allowed, though in many dialects putting the adverb "immediately" directly before the verb is preferred. Aug 22 '14 at 13:50
  • Or So you’ll see the notification immediately when information crucial to you changes (I at least don't like crucial for you there). All three positions for immediately are perfectly okay, but the crucial for/to you information in #1 is a total no-no. Aug 22 '14 at 14:13
  • @FF Yes, I rushed to check 'crucial for you'; I can't say it's not allowable. I prefer your rewrite; you can get away with 'So you'll see immediately the notification when the crucial (for you) information changes.' Brackets can cover a multitude of syntax sins. Aug 22 '14 at 14:55
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Immidiately is an adverb [of time], and just as the tag summary mentions, the position of an adverb often depends on the kind of adverb (manner, place, time, degree) and if the word being modified is a verb or an adjective.

According to English grammar, if you want to have the adverb at the beginning rather the end of a sentence, it must be placed before the main verb but after auxiliary verbs.

So here, the second sentence is the correct one:

✔ So you’ll immediately see the notification when information crucial for you changes.

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  • No, crucial is an adjective, but can take a complement. Information crucial for you = information which is crucial for you. While I agree with Neeku's main point, I observe that they cannot be a native English speaker, as the English grammar is not colloquial in any English I am familiar with, and at is the preposition used for the beginning or end of something.
    – Colin Fine
    Aug 22 '14 at 14:23
  • Thanks for clarification @ColinFine. I edited my post. (: However I couldn't manage to make the heads or tails of that sentence without your comment, even after reading it several times. Would a comma before "changes" improve the readability?
    – Neeku
    Aug 22 '14 at 14:32
  • It might make it clearer, though the pedants will complain that you're not allowed to separate the subject and the verb with a comma.
    – Colin Fine
    Aug 22 '14 at 19:06

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