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My instructor asked me to omit the ''to be'' verb in this sentence: Her house was across the street, an enormous neoclassical edifice with a formal garden. I tried: Situated across the street, her house, an enormous neoclassical edifice, had a formal garden. But, this doesn't seem right to me grammatically. Can anyone suggest me the right way of conversion?

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    try the ELL site ... – Fattie Aug 16 '14 at 14:26
  • 'Omit' means leave out / exclude. Unless you add another verb, you won't have a sentence. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 16 '14 at 14:33
  • Your suggested solution is not ungrammatical. But it does separate the {enormous neoclassical edifice + formal garden} rather inappropriately unless you want to highlight the formal garden. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 16 '14 at 15:12
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Her house, an enormous neoclassical edifice across the street, had a formal garden.

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Her house stood across the street, an enormous neoclassical edifice with a formal garden.

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    Yes, I'm happy with this. But consider 'Her house stood opposite the telephone box, an enormous neoclassical edifice with a formal garden.' – Edwin Ashworth Aug 16 '14 at 14:48
  • @EdwinAshworth - but that is a problem for the instructor. The same issue arises in the original sentence, so why would the OP have to worry about that? – oerkelens Aug 16 '14 at 14:54
  • No; the original sentence is not incorrect as it is not ambiguous and is only faintly humorous. Replacing 'Her house was across the street' with 'Her house was across the street from the main Post Office' switches the modification to the nearer sensible-to-choose noun phrase. I'm warning about the non-generality of Wyclef's suggested solution. Why shouldn't OP be informed about that? – Edwin Ashworth Aug 16 '14 at 15:08
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Across the street, her house, an enormous neoclassical edifice, had a formal garden.

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