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What are some phrase/word synonyms for the phrase 'Question Everything'. My friend came up with nullius in verba, which I really like, and I was wondering what others are out there?

Edit (from comments): Perhaps synonym was not a good word-my vocabulary is not the best. I am just looking for phrases that portray a similar idea. The context would be potential tattoo phrases.

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    This is confusing me—are you asking for something in English? Because the example you give is in Latin. Are you asking for a synonym? Because the example you give is not a synonym, but rather something is vaguely related. Question everything is itself very literal—are you looking for something more like a proverb? In which context do you want to use this phrase or word? – user85526 Aug 15 '14 at 22:40
  • You could go with: Think! But that may be too obscure to those who don't. – Jim Aug 15 '14 at 22:45
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    Perhaps synonym was not a good word-my vocabulary is not the best. I am just looking for phrases that portray a similar idea. The context would be potential tattoo phrases. – jlars62 Aug 15 '14 at 22:46
  • Okay, that works. If you're looking for a word for a person who questions everything, Daniel's answer is perfect. – user85526 Aug 16 '14 at 0:22
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Someone who questions is a skeptic. Dictionary.com:

1. a person who questions the validity or authenticity of something purporting to be factual.
2. a person who maintains a doubting attitude, as toward values, plans, statements, or the character of others.

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If you want an expression, a doubting Thomas may fit:

  • a person who refuses to believe anything until they are given proof.

Usage notes:

  • In the Bible, Thomas would not believe that Jesus had come back from the dead until he saw him. He's a real doubting Thomas - he simply wouldn't believe I'd won the car until he saw it with his own eyes.

Source: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/a+doubting+Thomas

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"Trust no one" and "trust nobody" come up often enough.

"Don't believe everything you read" (variant: "everything you hear") is a common saying.

Those both focus on the negative side. Some more positive options are "stay curious" and "seek the truth." (That's veritas quaere if you prefer Latin, and who doesn't?)

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My synonym for the imperative to Question everything! would be just Doubt!

(My 8th-grade math teacher taught us to "never accept anything on guzzle". That was in the context of math proof, but we learned it generally.)

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"Doubt is not a pleasant condition, but certainty is an absurd one." - Voltair

In context, he's stating that there is no consice evidence to define God, and as such no certainty as to God's nature can exist, but doubt when considering the existence of God has consequences in Christian theologies. In any context, it's still reasonable to assert that no absolute certainty exists, only a hypothesis that's yet to be disproved, and any doubt to that hypothesis can result in ridicule, ostracism, etc. Still, it's better than blindy embracing 'the truth'. Anyway, that's how I interpret it. Open to interpretation as it is, the statement ironically proves and disproves itself.

  • Welcome to EL&U. Could you explain what this quote means in terms of the question asked? Voltaire is a great philosopher and I'm interested in hearing more about this. – Adam Sep 20 '15 at 7:27
  • In context, he's stating that there is no consice evidence to define God, and as such no certainty as to God's nature can exist, but doubt when considering the existence of God has consequences in Christian theologies. In any context, it's still reasonable to assert that no absolute certainty exists, only a hypothesis that's yet to be disproved, and any doubt to that hypothesis can result in ridicule, ostracism, etc. Still, it's better than blindy embracing 'the truth'. Anyway, that's how I interpret it. Open to interpretation as it is, the statement ironically proves and disproves itself. – user1103 Sep 20 '15 at 8:31
  • You're welcome! That's an interesting explanation. I encourage you to add that to your answer and tie it in with the question that was asked. – Adam Sep 20 '15 at 8:35

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