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  • I was surprised Paola agreed to come on the trip, just her and me.

  • I was surprised Paola agreed to come on the trip, just me and her.

Both versions sound OK to me. Or is it there a more appropriate one?

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    Don't rely on your intuitions about English grammaticality, then. Accept can't take an infinitive complement, so they're both ungrammatical. The order of me and her is not a grammatical issue, any more than the order of Bill and Paola would be in the same context. Get the real stuff right before you worry about imaginary problem. Commented Aug 15, 2014 at 15:02
  • @John Lawler Sorry, could you give me a correct example of the sentence then?
    – wyc
    Commented Aug 15, 2014 at 15:04
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    I was surprised Paola had agreed to come on the trip. Change accepted to agreed, which can take an infinitive complement; and note that the idiom is go on a trip, not go to. Like I said, get the real stuff right first. Commented Aug 15, 2014 at 15:07
  • I was surprised Paola had agreed to come on the trip with me. or I was surprised Paola had agreed to come with me on my trip.
    – SrJoven
    Commented Aug 15, 2014 at 16:41
  • Polite phrasing (not grammar) tends to suggest you/me is the last entry in a list. Those on the trip were Bob, Suzy, Jane, and me. However, there is no fixed reason that needs to be the case. Those with me on the trip were ... can handle the case were me is first, if you want to say it.
    – SrJoven
    Commented Aug 15, 2014 at 16:49

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To be honest I think the whole sentence is a bit clumsy with either.

I would suggest something along the lines of:

I was surprised Paola had decided to come on the trip, as it would be just the two of us.

Of course, I could be misreading the meaning of your original sentence - I'm assuming you are surprised because Paola has decided to attend a trip with just yourself?

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  • Yes, but I think I find your sentence even more confusing. As it would be? Sounds like something that is and would be at the same time. Maybe I'm mistaken. The sentence just means, Paola decided to come with me to the trip, even though it was just me and her. The one I wrote it's just a shorter version.
    – wyc
    Commented Aug 15, 2014 at 13:36
  • At the time you were surprised, the trip was a future event - so you were surprised, because of what would result.. does that make sense?
    – PugFugly
    Commented Aug 15, 2014 at 13:45

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