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I want to express a connection from one thing to several other items in one phrase. Specifically, how can I correct the following paragraph:

Ghahremani et al (2013) showed that a significant negative relationship exists between hindering factors, psychological, social, cultural, managerial micro-scales, facilities, equipment and sport participation of female teachers.

to mean that there is a negative relationship between

  • "hindering factors and psychological, social, cultural, managerial micro-scales, and facilities and equipment" and
  • "sport participation of female teachers"?

Can "between" be used here or is there another way to say this?

May I also use "with" to re-phrase the above paragraph? e.g.
..showed that there is a significant negative relationship between hindering factors and psychological, social, cultural, and managerial micro-scales, and facilities and equipment WITH participation of female teachers.

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  • ... negative correlation exists between A and each of B, C, D, E ... Aug 8 '14 at 13:14
  • Please add it as an answer
    – codezombie
    Aug 8 '14 at 13:50
  • I think it's too simplistic to give as an answer here on ELU, misaq. It's often a judgement call between helping people with genuine requests for help, and making sure that questions that are fairly basic don't usurp the ethos of the site. There are other help sites: ELL, for instance, was set up to address more basic questions (the name is perhaps unfortunate). Aug 8 '14 at 14:15
  • Edwin's negative correlation is familiar, meaning When A goes up, B goes down, but when A goes down, B goes up. But I don't recognise OP's significant negative relationship usage. My first thought is it might mean The existence of A has a negative effect on B, but on balance I think OP's example sentence is just poor phrasing. Aug 8 '14 at 15:39
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Since it's a bit of a long sentence, I'd be inclined to front-load the important element (participation of female teachers) so that the list of factors can be read with this in mind.

Also, are "psychological, social, cultural" modifiers for "hindering factors" — that seems a little unclear as it currently reads.

I'd be inclined to re-phrase, e.g.

Ghahremani et al (2013) showed that there was a significant negative impact on sport participation of female teachers from hindering factors (psychological, social and cultural), managerial micro-scales, facilities and equipment.

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    +1 but you can also use something like "due to hindering factors" instead of "from hindering factors".
    – MrHen
    Aug 19 '14 at 14:59
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I would use to:

Ghahremani et al (2013) showed that a significant negative relationship exists between hindering factors, psychological, social, cultural, managerial micro-scales, facilities and equipment TO sport participation of female teachers.

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    The expression 'between X to Y' is hitherto unknown, to the best of my knowledge. Aug 8 '14 at 13:12
  • I agree with @EdwinAshworth
    – codezombie
    Aug 8 '14 at 13:48
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I would change the order:

Ghahremani et al (2013) showed that hindering factors, psychological, social, cultural, managerial micro-scales, facilities and equipment have a significant negative effect on the sport participation of female teachers.

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