1

Is there such a word? Find this one hard to describe:

cartoon picture of face slightly smiling

cartoon picture of face slightly smiling

picture of Weird Al Yankovic's face slightly smiling

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=77ZtOG6o6to&feature=youtu.be&t=6s

Edit: Hey guys I hope it's less unclear now with an added video. Please consider reopening.

  • In spite of the same style being used for the mouth, I don't find that the two expressions have that much in common. Maybe you should give a brief account of the situation in which the characters are. – Joce Aug 5 '14 at 7:30
  • 4
    Perhaps noseless? – tobyink Aug 5 '14 at 7:43
  • @Joce it's a restrained shocked / surprised while you're still smiling? – Harry Aug 5 '14 at 7:55
  • The raised eyebrows / wide eyes hint strongly at surprise (or the non-verbal communication of 'You don't see _that too often!' The mouth is a restrained grin (mild amusement / sense of wellbeing / signalling of friendship). The girl's tilted head hints at a matronly concern. One word? 'Sir Ian Mckellen can convey more by raising one eyebrow than many people can with 1000 words.' – Edwin Ashworth Aug 5 '14 at 10:43
  • It is very difficult to answer such a question without knowing what caused these characters to pull such faces. – Matt E. Эллен Aug 5 '14 at 11:28
2

Well they both look pretty wide-eyed to me.

wide-eyed [wahyd-ahyd]
adjective with the eyes open wide, as in amazement, innocence, or sleeplessness.

Source: Dictionary.com

  • Excellent probably the best answer so far. I'm not sure if it quite captures the freaky smile though. – Harry Aug 6 '14 at 5:26
2

I would call this a stunned or dazed expression.

(I see this all the time in anime, but hardly ever in English media. The closest example I can think of in English is Al Yankovic's reaction to Fran Drescher in UHF.)

  • Oh perfect. Thanks I'll add this to the examples. Stunned or dazed implies a look of confusion but maybe there's no perfect 1-worder for this. – Harry Aug 6 '14 at 5:21
  • Yeah, there's probably no perfect single word, at least in English. In long-form, I'd describe it as, "trying to hide shocked disbelief." – Carolyn Aug 6 '14 at 21:32
0

I've seen ladies with that look before— intense? OOD defines it as

Having or showing strong feelings or opinions; extremely earnest or serious:

an intense young woman, passionate about her art
a burning and intense look

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