1

Is it correct to say:

  • A: You can't say a word to anyone.
  • B: Yes, but you can't say a word to anyone either.

or

  • A: You can't say a word to anyone.
  • B:You can't say a word to anyone neither.

Neither a person A, nor a person B can't say a word. Shouldn't it be neither? (In the example I found it's either)

marked as duplicate by Robusto, FumbleFingers, anongoodnurse, tchrist, Kristina Lopez Jul 25 '14 at 18:08

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  • Could you please show your research? Otherwise this an off-topic proofreading request. – tchrist Jul 24 '14 at 18:45
  • 3
    The can't is already negative, so you use either. Neither is used for situations where the negative needs to be repeated because of conjunction: He didn't say a word, and neither did I. – John Lawler Jul 24 '14 at 18:47
  • In certain dialects, you might say "you can't say a word to noone neither." – Kit Z. Fox Jul 24 '14 at 18:51
2

The negation is already present in "can't", so "either" is used.

A variation with "neither" would be:

  • A: You can't say a word to anyone.
  • B: Neither can you [say a word to anyone].
1

The reason it is "either" is because your ending word is talking about the action, rather than a pair of people. Therefore, you should have "either" in that scenario. Additionally, I don't believe you're allowed to end a sentence with "neither", either. =)

Either: "You aren't allowed to A and you aren't allowed to B either."

Neither: "Neither person A nor person B are allowed to talk to anyone."

Extra source: Either/Neither Examples

  • 1
    (1) Why didn't you use NOR in the second sentence? (2) In the second sentence as well shouldn't we use IS instead of ARE? – Adam Jul 24 '14 at 18:59
  • No, the second sentence should stay "are." Imagine replacing persons A and B with the word "they." "They are allowed to talk to anyone." – AmanteDelDio Jul 24 '14 at 19:03
  • @Adam You're right on the 'nor'. I was contemplating how to approach the example there and overlooked that. Thank you =). – Xrylite Jul 24 '14 at 19:07
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    According to GMAT rules I believe we should use IS. Here is the rule 800score.com/content/guidec4view1V1d.html . Your thoughts on this please. – Adam Jul 24 '14 at 22:05

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