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From page 228 of Thinking Like a Lawyer by Frederick Schauer:

The law is presumed unconstitutional, but the state may rebut that presumption by satisfying a heavy burden of justification. Conversely, when a statute draws a classification within this category of “suspect” classifications, it is presumed to be constitutionally permissible and will be invalidated only if the challenger meets its burden of proving that the classification is irrational.

This doesn't appear in the legal dictionary or at http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/draw?q=draw or Google.

closed as off-topic by tchrist, FumbleFingers, anongoodnurse, user66974, oerkelens Jul 24 '14 at 15:38

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I checked out page 228 of the book (thanks to your precise reference). In the said context, draw will mean attract or bring upon itself.

This usage is akin to:

This form of felony usually draws (attracts) a year of imprisonment.

or:

He drew the ire of his peers with his controversial remarks.

Also, the word within in this context is not associated with the word draw. Rather, it is used to indicate the choosing of a classification from within a set of classifications.

To summarize, the meaning of the given sentence can be written as:

When a statute is viewed as potentially falling under a suspect classification, it is presumed to be constitutionally permissible unless a challenger can prove otherwise.

or

When a statute attracts a classification from within a set of such suspect classifications, it is presumed to be constitutionally permissible unless a challenger can prove otherwise.

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